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APPLE VALLEY • After a five week hiatus, the Apple Valley Town Council will meet to discuss a variety of issues, including a code amendment to tighten rules for Internet cafes and hookah bars.

Amendments defining rules for the cafes and bars have not been previously addressed, according to a staff report.

If approved during Tuesday’s meeting, Internet cafes must obtain a special use permit and will not be allowed to operate sweepstakes, gaming-related computers or machines that allow electronic or non-electronic, gaming style entertainment for prizes.

Among the report, Hookah Bars must have a proper exhaust system, are not allowed to prepare and serve food and/or alcoholic beverages per state law, and must not allow sound to travel outside the building.

According to a town staff email, Apple Valley has one Internet cafe and no hookah bars.

Over the last few months, the town has received numerous inquiries to set up Hookah lounges.

The staff report noted that the San Bernardino County Sheriff’s Department recently seized more than 200 illegal gaming machines from four Internet cafes in Hesperia.

Soon after, one Apple Valley cafe operator withdrew his permission and three others closed shops in Apple Valley, a staff report said.

“The facts that these businesses have closed after the recent raids in Hesperia, leads staff to believe the cafes were not operating the business as described in its business outline submitted to the town,” the staff report said.

In March, after a four-month investigation into complaints of illegal gambling and access to gaming machines, about 30 law enforcement officers raided the facilities, a sheriff’s news release stated.

The sheriff’s High Tech Crimes Division and the California Department of Justice Gambling Control Bureau had been investigating the case.

The full list of code amendments for the cafes and bars can be found online at www.applevalley.org.

Rene De La Cruz may bereached at 760-951-6227 or at RDeLaCruz@VVDailyPress.com.

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Article source: http://www.vvdailypress.com/articles/cafes-41776-hookah-internet.html

SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) -  The New Mexico Supreme Court is scheduled to hear a case about a Las Cruces man accused of running a gambling enterprise out of his Internet cafe.

The state's high court is slated Monday to hear arguments in the case involving businessman Michael T. Vento.

Last year, a state Court of Appeals overturned Vento's conviction of commercial gambling, a fourth-degree felony. Vento lost his business in July 2008 after the state Gaming Control Board raided it and seized his 21 computer terminals.

Gov. Susana Martinez, a district attorney when Vento was operating his Las Cruces cafe, prosecuted him for commercial gambling.

But the 64-year-old Vento says he only provided his customers a chance to win sweepstakes prizes.

Copyright Associated Press, Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Article source: http://www.kasa.com/dpps/news/crime/court-to-hear-internet-cafe-gambling-case_6627249

SANTA FE Michael T. Vento says he was a legitimate businessman running an internet café.

Prosecutors allege that he was an inventive criminal operating a gambling den in Las Cruces.

Each side will argue its case Monday morning before the New Mexico Supreme Court.

Vento, now 64, lost his business in July 2008 after the state Gaming Control Board raided it and seized his 21 computer terminals. Investigators said he was running illegal sweepstakes games on the web.

Vento had checked the Gaming Control Board's website, and it said a gambling place did not include a location where a business offered a sweepstakes promotion. To his way of thinking, that put him in league with McDonald's restaurants and their Monopoly games, not a casino.

But a jury in 2009 convicted Vento of commercial gambling, a fourth-degree felony.

He challenged the conviction, and the state Court of Appeals overturned the guilty verdict last summer.

A three-member panel of the appeals court found that Lisa Schultz, the state district judge who presided at Vento's trial, should have instructed the jury on betting. The appeals court ruled that there was insufficient evidence to support a conviction of Vento for having "gambling devices" in the form of computer terminals.

On yet another appeal, the state Supreme Court then accepted Vento's case for review.

Assistant Attorney General Jacqueline R. Medina said in her brief to the Supreme Court that Vento's internet café was a gambling operation, despite his attempts to disguise it.

"It is abundantly clear that the manner in which defendant ran his so-called sweepstakes was nothing more than an attempt to circumvent New Mexico's statutory provisions that regulate and prohibit gambling," Medina said Vento's public defender, Mary Barket, called him a law-abiding citizen who "took care to comply with New Mexico's gambling laws in setting up a sweepstakes in conjunction with his internet café."

Vento said he followed the example of corporate giants Coca-Cola and McDonald's when he provided customers an opportunity to win sweepstakes prizes at his internet café.

"To entice people to visit his place of business, Michael offered a sweepstakes," Barket wrote in her brief. "One hundred sweepstakes credits were offered every 24 hours without purchasing anything."

Top prize in each sweepstakes game was $3,000, though higher payoffs were possible by rolling over winnings.

One means of checking whether one won a sweepstakes was through "a series of casino-like games" on the web, prosecutors said. Customers also could simply swipe their card to see if they had won a prize or ask a cashier to check the card for them.

Medina in her brief said Vento wanted the Supreme Court to believe that "his patrons purchased $806,207 of internet time and that he gave sweepstakes entries to them for free."

Vento's lawyer have said that was exactly how his internet café operated. His cut was 8 percent of sweepstakes winnings, taken before a payout, according to one account he gave an investigator from the Gaming Control Board.

The Supreme Court initially listed Vento's case as one that would be decided by briefs, but it subsequently called for oral arguments.

Milan Simonich, Santa Fe Bureau chief of Texas-New Mexico Newspapers, can be reached at 505-820-6898. His blog is at nmcapitolreport.com.



Article source: http://www.currentargus.com/ci_23828215/nm-supreme-court-decide-whether-man-ran-internet

SANTA FE Michael T. Vento says he was a legitimate businessman running an internet café.

Prosecutors allege that he was an inventive criminal operating a gambling den in Las Cruces.

Each side will argue its case Monday morning before the New Mexico Supreme Court.

Vento, now 64, lost his business in July 2008 after the state Gaming Control Board raided it and seized his 21 computer terminals. Investigators said he was running illegal sweepstakes games on the web.

Vento had checked the Gaming Control Board's website, and it said a gambling place did not include a location where a business offered a sweepstakes promotion. To his way of thinking, that put him in league with McDonald's restaurants and their Monopoly games, not a casino.

But a jury in 2009 convicted Vento of commercial gambling, a fourth-degree felony.

He challenged the conviction, and the state Court of Appeals overturned the guilty verdict last summer.

A three-member panel of the appeals court found that Lisa Schultz, the state district judge who presided at Vento's trial, should have instructed the jury on betting. The appeals court ruled that there was insufficient evidence to support a conviction of Vento for having "gambling devices" in the form of computer terminals.

On yet another appeal, the state Supreme Court then accepted Vento's case for review.

Assistant Attorney General Jacqueline R. Medina said in her brief to the Supreme Court that Vento's internet café was a gambling operation, despite his attempts to disguise it.

"It is abundantly clear that the manner in which defendant ran his so-called sweepstakes was nothing more than an attempt to circumvent New Mexico's statutory provisions that regulate and prohibit gambling," Medina said Vento's public defender, Mary Barket, called him a law-abiding citizen who "took care to comply with New Mexico's gambling laws in setting up a sweepstakes in conjunction with his internet café."

Vento said he followed the example of corporate giants Coca-Cola and McDonald's when he provided customers an opportunity to win sweepstakes prizes at his internet café.

"To entice people to visit his place of business, Michael offered a sweepstakes," Barket wrote in her brief. "One hundred sweepstakes credits were offered every 24 hours without purchasing anything."

Top prize in each sweepstakes game was $3,000, though higher payoffs were possible by rolling over winnings.

One means of checking whether one won a sweepstakes was through "a series of casino-like games" on the web, prosecutors said. Customers also could simply swipe their card to see if they had won a prize or ask a cashier to check the card for them.

Medina in her brief said Vento wanted the Supreme Court to believe that "his patrons purchased $806,207 of internet time and that he gave sweepstakes entries to them for free."

Vento's lawyer have said that was exactly how his internet café operated. His cut was 8 percent of sweepstakes winnings, taken before a payout, according to one account he gave an investigator from the Gaming Control Board.

The Supreme Court initially listed Vento's case as one that would be decided by briefs, but it subsequently called for oral arguments.

Milan Simonich, Santa Fe Bureau chief of Texas-New Mexico Newspapers, can be reached at 505-820-6898. His blog is at nmcapitolreport.com.



Article source: http://www.ruidosonews.com/ci_23823231/state-high-court-hear-whether-man-ran-internet?source=most_viewed

HAYWARD -- The city was dealt a setback in its fight to close Internet cafes that operate casino-style "sweepstakes" games when a federal court ruled its moratorium could not be enforced because it was overly broad.

Hayward city staff members are drafting a new ordinance that will be presented to the City Council this fall, said Michael Lawson, city attorney. In the meantime, the current three Internet cafes in Hayward can remain open.

The City Council passed an ordinance in February shutting down the cafes, maintaining that their computer terminals featuring the sweepstakes games are a form of illegal gambling, and extended that moratorium in April. Owners of two Hayward cafes filed suit against the city in federal court.

According to the July ruling by U.S. District Judge Samuel Conti, the ordinance could apply to any business that offered computer access and other activities protected under the First Amendment.

Lawson said the city's ordinance focused on the sweepstakes components of the Internet cafes. "If they have legitimate business services they offer, such as faxing or Internet access, that's not a problem," he said. "But sweepstakes activity simulates gambling, and that is a problem."

The revised ordinance will be presented in September to the Planning Commission, and then likely go before the City Council in October, he said.

When the city started cracking down on the Internet cafes, there were three in Hayward: Worldnet Business Center on Vermont Street, Net Connection on B Street near City Hall and I Biz on Maple Court.

While Worldnet has since closed, another Internet cafe has opened on Main Street, this one called Chances Are.

Alameda County banned the sweepstakes games at Internet cafes earlier this year. In December, the California Bureau of Gambling Control issued an advisory that the sweepstakes games offered at the Internet cafes are illegal under state law.

Neighbors of the Internet cafes have complained to the city, saying the businesses are nuisances that attract unsavory people who loiter, smoke and litter.

Elie Goldstein, who owns Kraski's Nutrition Food Shop next door to I Biz, told the council last week that problems have increased in the nearby parking lot, including public drinking and illegal drug use, since the Internet cafe opened.

"We have been having quite a few vagrants hanging out due to, I believe, I Biz Internet cafe," he said. "Every week something's going on."

Contact Rebecca Parr at 510-293-2473 or follow her at Twitter.com/rdparr1.





Sunday August 4, 2013 11:38 AM

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After Dispatch Senior Editor Joe Hallett busted a private “fact-finding” gig on April 9 in the back room of a ritzy Columbus steakhouse involving state lawmakers and representatives of Internet cafe gambling interests, Ohio Senate President Keith Faber said GOP senators would return any campaign cash they had received this year from the controversial establishments.

Campaign-finance reports filed last week showed $11,000 worth of refunds — all within 10 days of the Dispatch story.

Faber himself returned $1,500, but the biggest “refunder” was Sen. Tom Patton of Strongsville, who gave back $4,500.

The refund policy did not apply to the $110,000 lawmakers got in 2012 from the Internet cafe industry.

On July 19, Ohio House Speaker William G. Batchelder called on state Rep. Peter Beck to resign after being indicted on 16 felony counts.

Last week, Batchelder picked the Republican from Cincinnati for a new legislative panel to study tax reform.

What gives?

“I think it is worth noting these are study committees and not standing committees, meaning that service is voluntary and there are no extra stipends for a member’s service,” said Batchelder spokesman Mike Dittoe, who noted everyone who asked was made a member. “Unlike standing House committees, there are not formal votes where legislation is passed.”

Speaking of standing committees, Beck remains a chairman, although the speaker could remove him at any time.

“No discussions have taken place on committee assignments at this time, largely because the House Ways Means Committee has not met since June and is not slated to meet over the summer,” Dittoe said. “If the speaker intends to make changes to the committee membership, it is likely that would take place prior to the next meeting.”

Toward the conclusion of Wednesday’s session in the U.S. House, Speaker John Boehner delivered a somewhat unusual announcement to his colleagues: “Members should wear appropriate business attire during all sittings of the House, however brief their appearance on the floor.”

The West Chester Republican, who never is seen around the House without a suit and tie, did not say what prompted his admonition. But perhaps it had to do with GOP Rep. Mark Sanford — yes, that Mark Sanford who vanished from the South Carolina’s governor’s office to visit his mistress in Argentina — showing up in the speaker’s lobby last week wearing gym shorts, T-shirt and sneakers. Apparently Sanford had just rushed from the House gym to cast a vote.

Dispatch Washington Bureau Chief Jack Torry contributed to this report.

Article source: http://www.dispatch.com/content/stories/local/2013/08/04/senators-returned-11000-to-internet-cafes.html

GILROY -- Authorities have cracked down on what they are calling an illegal gambling den disguised as an Internet cafe in a northwest Gilroy strip mall.

According to Gilroy police, the Liberty PCS store at 1325 First St. came on the radar in March, when it was being looked at for potential code violations. But after closer inspection and consultations with city, county and state legal counsel, it was determined that the venue would be scrutinized for possible criminal activity.

Undercover agents were able to pay to play casino-style games on desktop computers, including Keno, poker and slots, with potential for a payoff.

"During their visits, none of the clients in the business were ever seen accessing the Internet, a fax machine or other service," states a Gilroy police release. "Known felons were seen in the business."

It adds that "nefarious activities" were seen being conducted by individuals loitering inside and around the business, and a number of community members contacted police with complaints about what was going on at Liberty PCS.

And in the past week, police were called by a man pleading for something to be done.

"His father was frequenting the business and 'losing all of his money and pay checks there,' " states the release.

Agents determined that illegal gambling was taking place at Liberty PCS, according to Gilroy police.

A warrant was served on Thursday, with Gilroy police joined by state Department of Justice agents and Morgan Hill police. About 40 patrons were present at the time, and five were arrested for warrants and narcotics offenses unrelated to the operation.

Evidence was seized and the gambling case was submitted to the Santa Clara County District Attorney's Office for review.

Liberty PCS could not be reached for comment Friday evening.

Internet cafes offering "sweepstakes" games in which patrons purchase a phone or Internet card and are given a number of chances to win a payoff in a computer game have cropped up in communities throughout the state in recent years. Proponents compare it with a chance at prizes for buying a product at a fast-food franchise.

Contact Eric Kurhi at 408-920-5852. Follow him at Twitter.com/erickurhi.





Article source: http://www.mercurynews.com/crime-courts/ci_23787703/gilroy-authorities-crack-down-internet-cafe-offering-sweepstakes

Months after the Legislature passed a bill to outlaw them, an “Internet cafe” has reopened in Jacksonville with its employees wearing T-shirts with bull’s-eyes on the back.

“We were told by the city that we opened at our own risk and that we would have bull’s-eyes on our backs,” said Pete Miller, general manager of Pete’s Retreat Cyber Cafe on Normandy Boulevard.

Pete’s Retreat is owned by William Carpenter of North Carolina. Miller said he was speaking on behalf of the owner.

Like every other Internet cafe in Florida, Pete’s Retreat shut down in April after lawmakers passed a bill that banned about 1,000 strip-mall gaming centers from using slot-machine-like computer games. It reopened for business at 6 p.m. Friday and had about 70 people show up that night. On Monday about 245 people came, Miller said.

Miller said Pete’s Retreat has overhauled how it operates to conform with the new law but acknowledges that police may disagree.

“I don’t want to get shut down, and I really don’t want to get arrested,” Miller said. “But I’m confident what we’re doing is completely legal.”

The new state law leaves it up to local authorities to enforce the ban. The office of Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi said it would be up to the city of Jacksonville and the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office to determine whether Pete’s Retreat is breaking the law.

The Sheriff’s Office said it didn’t know about the reopening until Monday and is investigating if what the business is doing is legal.

“I cannot comment on any statements made by a business owner claiming to be in compliance of the law,” said Sheriff’s Office spokeswoman Lauri-Ellen Smith, while adding that Pete’s will be looked into.

Jacksonville Assistant General Counsel Jason Teal said the city, state attorney and sheriff would likely work together to determine whether Pete’s and any similar establishments that open up are legal.

“This is obviously a test balloon, and the whole state is watching, and if this one is allowed to remain open, I’d assume others will reopen as well,” Teal said.

Miller said the new equipment, supplied by Blue Water Technologies, puts Pete’s in compliance with the law because computer games are no longer used like slot machines. He said lawyers have looked at the new computer games and have said they are legal.

Teal said that may be correct.

“If the equipment doesn’t fall under the state law, then we can’t regulate it,” Teal said.

Games offered include “Shamrock 7” and “The Red Tailed Dragon.”

Despite the Legislature’s action months ago, Jacksonville Mayor Alvin Brown included a two-person office to continue regulating gaming centers — commonly called Internet cafes — in the 2014 budget he proposed July 15.

The office has run on money businesses paid for licenses and projected spending $179,000 in the coming year. There had been an expectation that business shuttered by state lawmakers might try to reopen, most likely after a court fight.

“With so much uncertainty, it was not operationally prudent to not budget for this activity,” Terrance Ashanta-Barker, director of the city’s Neighborhoods Department, said by email last week.

State Sen. John Thrasher, R-St. Augustine, who sponsored the law designed to shut the centers down, said it would next be up to police.

But if they’ve found a loophole, the Legislature will address it during the 2014 session, Thrasher said.

The law was passed about a month after 57 people, including top officials in the Jacksonville police union, were arrested in a racketeering investigation into St. Augustine-based Allied Veterans of the World.

Those arrests led to the resignation of Lt. Gov. Jennifer Carroll, who was paid $72,000 by Allied Veterans to do consulting work while a Northeast Florida legislator. Carroll has not been charged with any wrongdoing and all 57 people arrested are still awaiting trial.

Investigators say Allied Veterans, which calls itself a nonprofit, brought in
$300 million but gave only 2 percent to veterans groups.

Miller said Pete’s Retreat was different from Allied because it is a for-profit business that never claimed to be a charity.

But some aspects of Pete’s are similar to Allied.

Both argue they offer “sweepstakes” and not gambling. They sell customers Internet or phone time that allows them to get online. But most customers play sweepstakes that allow them to win money.

Thrasher’s bill did not address whether these types of sweepstakes are really gambling, and so the issue remains a gray area. The centers have argued that what they offer is no different from McDonald’s Monopoly games where money can be won.

But Florida Department of Agriculture spokeswoman Erin Gillespie said McDonald’s offers games to get people into the restaurant to buy food, while the centers want people to come so they can play the games.

Miller acknowledges most of his customers play the games, but some do use the Internet because they don’t have computers at home.

The company also makes its money from selling time on the computers and doesn’t make any money when the customers lose with the sweepstakes, he said.

Thrasher said these establishments take advantage of customers. But Miller said he objected to people like Thrasher denigrating his profession.

“There are thousands of people in Jacksonville who want to do this,” he said. “We’re not an evil industry.”

He employs 10 people and provides fun for customers who want to spend their free time playing sweepstakes, Miller said.

Mike DeSanto was one of the people who came to Pete’s this week. He was happy to see it had reopened.

“I come here and relax,” DeSanto said. “Get all the stress out.”

DeSanto said lawmakers shouldn’t target these establishments and said what he was doing wasn’t gambling.

“If this is gambling, then dog tracks and poker rooms are gambling, too,” he said.

Times-Union writer Steve Patterson contributed to this article.

larry.hannan@jacksonville.com, (904) 359-4470

Article source: http://jacksonville.com/news/crime/2013-07-31/story/petes-retreat-cyber-cafe-reopens-jacksonville-following-gaming-crackdo-0

SANTA FE McDonald's offered a Monopoly sweepstakes game with its burgers and fries. Coca-Cola had a promotion in which certain bottle caps could be exchanged for prizes.

Businessman Michael T. Vento says he merely followed the example of those corporate giants when he provided customers an opportunity to win sweepstakes prizes at his Internet cafe in Las Cruces.

Gov. Susana Martinez, a district attorney when Vento was operating his Internet cafe, prosecuted him for commercial gambling.

Martinez's staff won the first round, persuading a jury to convict Vento in 2009. The state Court of Appeals overturned his conviction last summer.

Now the New Mexico Supreme Court has accepted the case and will decide whether Vento was an enterprising businessman on the right side of the law or the proprietor of a high-tech gambling operation that violated state statutes.

Vento, now 63, never had a conviction except for speeding tickets until the gambling case.

In her brief, Vento's public defender, Mary Barket, called him a law-abiding citizen who "took care to comply with New Mexico's gambling laws in setting up a sweepstakes in conjunction with his Internet cafe."

He distributed forms to customers, advising them that they were buying time on the Web when they signed up to use one of the 21 computer terminals at his Internet Access Depot. He shuttered his business after it was raided by the state Gaming Control Board in July 2008. The agency seized his computers.

Vento charged 10 cents a minute or $6 an hour for access to the Internet at his cafe. But he required an initial payment of at least $20, according to court records.

His defenders say all of it was on the up and up.

"To entice people to visit his place of business, Michael offered a sweepstakes," Barket wrote in her brief. "One hundred sweepstakes credits were offered every 24 hours without purchasing anything."

Top prize in each sweepstakes game was $3,000, though higher payoffs were possible by rolling over winnings.

One means of checking whether one won a sweepstakes was through "a series of casino-like games" on the Web, prosecutors said. Customers also could simply swipe their card to see if they had won a prize or ask a cashier to check the card for them.

Assistant Attorney General Jacqueline R. Medina said in her brief that Vento's Internet operation was illegal, no matter how he tried to disguise it.

"It is abundantly clear that the manner in which the defendant ran his so-called sweepstakes was nothing more than an attempt to circumvent New Mexico's statutory provisions that regulate and prohibit gambling," Medina said.

By the state's account, customers bought about $640,000 of additional sweepstakes entries from their winnings.

Medina said Vento wants the Supreme Court to believe that "his patrons purchased $806,207 of Internet time and that he gave sweepstakes entries to them for free."

Vento's lawyers have said that was exactly how his Internet cafe operated. His cut was 8 percent of sweepstakes winnings, taken before a payout, according to one account he gave an investigator from the New Mexico Gaming Control Board.

"Why would patrons pay for the internet when they could access it free at most McDonald's, Starbucks, public libraries and other businesses?" Medina asked.

One reason might be that one needs a laptop of his own at businesses such as Starbucks. No computer terminals are available to the public in most coffee shops or restaurants.

Even so, prosecutors say Vento's Internet business was "nothing more than a subterfuge" that siphoned money from state-run gambling operations such as the lottery.

At Vento's trial, the government and his lawyer battled over the wording of jury instructions. His side wanted an explanation of a sweepstakes, a request that was denied by state District Judge Lisa C. Schultz.

She simply read the jury a gambling statute, and that was why the state Court of Appeals overturning Vento's conviction.

Vento had checked the Gaming Control Board's website and it said a gambling place did not include a location where a business offered a sweepstakes promotion. To his way of thinking, that put him in league with McDonald's, not a casino.

The Court of Appeals found that the jury should have been instructed on betting, and that there was insufficient evidence to support a conviction of Vento for having gambling devices in the form of his computer terminals.

The Supreme Court will rule based on the briefs filed by lawyers for the government and Vento. The five justices are scheduled to read the briefs in July. They could rule in a few months or their decision may take more than a year.

Milan Simonich, Santa Fe bureau chief of Texas-New Mexico Newspapers, can be reached at msimonich@tnmnp.com or (505) 820-6898. His blog is at nmcapitolreport.com.

After KTVU showed up at an indiscreet “Internet café” that appeared to provide online gambling in Concord Tuesday afternoon, the business announced that it was shutting down.

Some Concord residents had questions about “The Hills,” a business located at the Dana Plaza Shopping Center that offered “internet gaming,” and asked KTVU to investigate.

They told KTVU that the business, which was typically open until 2 a.m. since it grand opening earlier this year, brought nothing but bad luck to the neighborhood near the shopping center.

“Now it's bicycle thefts, auto break-ins in broad daylight,” said Matt Kern, a neighbor. It's gone from being a quiet little neighborhood to looking like out front of a dive casino in Vegas or Reno.”

KTVU reporter Eric Rasmussen went inside the establishment with a camera crew Tuesday afternoon and found that it was so busy no one said a word to them when they walked in.

When they spoke to the woman at the cash register, she waved her hands and told KTVU, “I’m not talking!”

She later explained customers buy internet time in exchange for entries into these sweepstakes games that pay out real money.

In May, the Concord City Attorney sent a cease and desist letter saying city staff observed 25 computers set up to play games but saw “no other business activity” which violated zoning and “constitutes an unlawful nuisance.”

While KTVU’s crew was still in the business Tuesday, the manager suddenly announced they were closing.

“They're shutting down 'cause you guys are out here!” the woman said.

Other Bay Area cities have passed bans and moratoriums on Internet cafes because of similar cases and some longtime neighbors who live just steps from the shopping center said they hope Concord does the same.

“I can see what's going on,” said Noella Sherwood, a nearby resident. “We need a legitimate business up there. [The Hills] to me, is not a legitimate business.”

KTVU could not reach the owner, who apparently lives in the Sacramento area.

But the owners have reportedly already told the city they were planning to leave the Concord location. If they don't, the city attorney told KTVU that he was prepared to file an injunction in court.

Article source: http://www.ktvu.com/news/news/crime-law/ktvu-report-results-internet-cafe-closure/nY2dt/