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Black River Falls Public Library has opened a new internet cafe to provide a space for personal computer use – and a cup of coffee, too.

The library last Tuesday held an open house for the new space, which is housed in the facility’s newly refurbished program room. BRF Public Library Director Tammy Peasley said the idea for the cafe comes from a desire to meet the needs of patrons who sometimes are looking for a bookstore-like experience.

“It’s just learning about the services of the library and meeting the needs of our current patrons and one of those is creating a place that is kind of a community space,” Peasley said. “So instead of having the perception of the library that it’s one where you don’t talk and everybody whispers – here’s a place where you can come and socialize.”

The library used about $9,000 in local grant funding and donations to finance the renovation of the program room, which now has hard flooring, new tables and chairs and a single-serving coffee maker so patrons can brew a cup and enjoy it while using the library’s wireless internet on their personal devices.

Peasley said the library in the past had allowed beverages, but it sometimes led to spilling on the carpeting. The internet cafe now can serve as the beverage-only space where patrons can pay $1.50 for a single-serving of coffee at the front desk and then also get the benefit of newly improved wireless internet access points to get web service on their own laptops, phones or other tablet-like devices in the cafe area.

BRF Library Board President Jay Eddy said the revamp of the program room is a welcome change and one that helps the local community provide a niche not otherwise available in the immediate area.

“The library board felt that it would be nice to take our conference room and give those people a place to go who are using the wireless type of thing and maybe take them out of the general area – and if they had a cup of coffee they could do that without being in the regular area of the library, too,” he said. “Not only can we bring that to the public and (we can) also make them aware of hopefully other library functions as well.

“I think that’s part of it – if you’re going to provide a service to the public, you should stay up to date with what the public is looking for.”

The addition of the internet cafe comes amid other recent revamps in the library like the addition of a teen-designated area and new children’s area. The facility also underwent a layout reconfiguration during a system-wide circulation system changeover. The new areas were part of an effort to give the library an “ambiance” that many facilities are looking to create, Peasley said.

“Each move was in response to a perceived need and an idea to provide services to the community,” she said. “The staff has been absolutely very supportive and involved in participating in the changes and from what I hear from staff and from patrons – the changes have been well received and appreciated.”

Eddy agreed.

“I think the changes have been awesome. We’ve taken a traditional library that was certainly functional but not as user-friendly as it could be and kind of updated it and made it more user friendly,” he said. “I hope everybody that is interested gets down there and takes a look at (the internet cafe). I think they’ll be really pleasantly surprised. That’s my big hope – that we keep people looking at our library as a great resource for the community.”

The program room will be used as the internet cafe unless there are scheduled events or programs scheduled for the room, Peasley said.

Black River Falls Public Library has opened a new internet cafe to provide a space for personal computer use – and a cup of coffee, too.

The library last Tuesday held an open house for the new space, which is housed in the facility’s newly refurbished program room. BRF Public Library Director Tammy Peasley said the idea for the cafe comes from a desire to meet the needs of patrons who sometimes are looking for a bookstore-like experience.

“It’s just learning about the services of the library and meeting the needs of our current patrons and one of those is creating a place that is kind of a community space,” Peasley said. “So instead of having the perception of the library that it’s one where you don’t talk and everybody whispers – here’s a place where you can come and socialize.”

The library used about $9,000 in local grant funding and donations to finance the renovation of the program room, which now has hard flooring, new tables and chairs and a single-serving coffee maker so patrons can brew a cup and enjoy it while using the library’s wireless internet on their personal devices.

Peasley said the library in the past had allowed beverages, but it sometimes led to spilling on the carpeting. The internet cafe now can serve as the beverage-only space where patrons can pay $1.50 for a single-serving of coffee at the front desk and then also get the benefit of newly improved wireless internet access points to get web service on their own laptops, phones or other tablet-like devices in the cafe area.

BRF Library Board President Jay Eddy said the revamp of the program room is a welcome change and one that helps the local community provide a niche not otherwise available in the immediate area.

“The library board felt that it would be nice to take our conference room and give those people a place to go who are using the wireless type of thing and maybe take them out of the general area – and if they had a cup of coffee they could do that without being in the regular area of the library, too,” he said. “Not only can we bring that to the public and (we can) also make them aware of hopefully other library functions as well.

“I think that’s part of it – if you’re going to provide a service to the public, you should stay up to date with what the public is looking for.”

The addition of the internet cafe comes amid other recent revamps in the library like the addition of a teen-designated area and new children’s area. The facility also underwent a layout reconfiguration during a system-wide circulation system changeover. The new areas were part of an effort to give the library an “ambiance” that many facilities are looking to create, Peasley said.

“Each move was in response to a perceived need and an idea to provide services to the community,” she said. “The staff has been absolutely very supportive and involved in participating in the changes and from what I hear from staff and from patrons – the changes have been well received and appreciated.”

Eddy agreed.

“I think the changes have been awesome. We’ve taken a traditional library that was certainly functional but not as user-friendly as it could be and kind of updated it and made it more user friendly,” he said. “I hope everybody that is interested gets down there and takes a look at (the internet cafe). I think they’ll be really pleasantly surprised. That’s my big hope – that we keep people looking at our library as a great resource for the community.”

The program room will be used as the internet cafe unless there are scheduled events or programs scheduled for the room, Peasley said.

Black River Falls Public Library has opened a new internet cafe to provide a space for personal computer use – and a cup of coffee, too.

The library last Tuesday held an open house for the new space, which is housed in the facility’s newly refurbished program room. BRF Public Library Director Tammy Peasley said the idea for the cafe comes from a desire to meet the needs of patrons who sometimes are looking for a bookstore-like experience.

“It’s just learning about the services of the library and meeting the needs of our current patrons and one of those is creating a place that is kind of a community space,” Peasley said. “So instead of having the perception of the library that it’s one where you don’t talk and everybody whispers – here’s a place where you can come and socialize.”

The library used about $9,000 in local grant funding and donations to finance the renovation of the program room, which now has hard flooring, new tables and chairs and a single-serving coffee maker so patrons can brew a cup and enjoy it while using the library’s wireless internet on their personal devices.

Peasley said the library in the past had allowed beverages, but it sometimes led to spilling on the carpeting. The internet cafe now can serve as the beverage-only space where patrons can pay $1.50 for a single-serving of coffee at the front desk and then also get the benefit of newly improved wireless internet access points to get web service on their own laptops, phones or other tablet-like devices in the cafe area.

BRF Library Board President Jay Eddy said the revamp of the program room is a welcome change and one that helps the local community provide a niche not otherwise available in the immediate area.

“The library board felt that it would be nice to take our conference room and give those people a place to go who are using the wireless type of thing and maybe take them out of the general area – and if they had a cup of coffee they could do that without being in the regular area of the library, too,” he said. “Not only can we bring that to the public and (we can) also make them aware of hopefully other library functions as well.

“I think that’s part of it – if you’re going to provide a service to the public, you should stay up to date with what the public is looking for.”

The addition of the internet cafe comes amid other recent revamps in the library like the addition of a teen-designated area and new children’s area. The facility also underwent a layout reconfiguration during a system-wide circulation system changeover. The new areas were part of an effort to give the library an “ambiance” that many facilities are looking to create, Peasley said.

“Each move was in response to a perceived need and an idea to provide services to the community,” she said. “The staff has been absolutely very supportive and involved in participating in the changes and from what I hear from staff and from patrons – the changes have been well received and appreciated.”

Eddy agreed.

“I think the changes have been awesome. We’ve taken a traditional library that was certainly functional but not as user-friendly as it could be and kind of updated it and made it more user friendly,” he said. “I hope everybody that is interested gets down there and takes a look at (the internet cafe). I think they’ll be really pleasantly surprised. That’s my big hope – that we keep people looking at our library as a great resource for the community.”

The program room will be used as the internet cafe unless there are scheduled events or programs scheduled for the room, Peasley said.

INTERNET

| Dec. 22, 2014, 2:35 p.m.
401 internet cafés registered in Ivory Coast

By Issa Sikiti da Silva, Ivory Coast

A total of 401 internet cafés are currently officially registered in Ivory Coast, according to the regulator’s updated report released last week.

The Autorité de Régulation des Télécommunications de Cote d’Ivoire (ARTCI) has, since mid-June this year, been calling on the owners and managers of internet cafés – known here as cyber café – to register their businesses online for free by logging on its website, or coming personally to their offices in Marcory, Abidjan.

And by 10 December 2014, ARTCI said only 401 outlets have responded to this call. Most of these businesses are located in the commercial capital Abidjan, the report shows.

The government said that the operation aims at preventing the proliferation of white-collar crime and combating cyber-criminality in the country, which appears to have reached alarming rates.

“I think the government is right to undertake such an operation though I doubt very much how this is going to eradicate online crime,” Jean-Marie Koné said.

Ivory Coast, also known as ‘Little France’ by its neighbours, has been invaded by brouteurs coming from all over the region. 

Some residents in Abidjan have described them as flashy cyber-criminals who spend several hours at internet cafés searching for online victims to rob.

Last year, the brouteurs operating from Ivory Coast stole about US$10 million, according to police figures.

The state is hoping that the registration of these outlets would help identify these ‘crooks’ and bring them to justice.

But some owners and managers have branded this registration ‘unfair’, saying it could be more than about combating cyber-crime.

“I suspect that the state has a hidden agenda about internet cafés. I’m not sure what is it but I heard they want to impose higher taxes and toughen the law to make it difficult to open an internet café,”one owner said on condition of anonymity.

While some observers have noted that this could be the first of its kind in West Africa, some observers believe registering them was not enough to curb online crime.

“We need an internet police, some sort of well-trained security agents who will operate undercover to patrol these outlets, and perhaps catch them red-handed,” Delphine Kouamé said. 

Though the deadline to register their businesses was on 30 November 2014, the regulator continues to plead with internet cafés owners to come forward and do the right thing.

Internet cafés that will not be registered will simply be closed, the regulator insisted, without elaborating on the new cut-off date.

Article source: http://www.biztechafrica.com/article/401-internet-cafes-registered-ivory-coast/9400/

Kentucky State Senator Mike Wilson (R-Bowling Green) has renewed his efforts to have internet cafe-style gambling banned in the Commonwealth by pre-filing the framework for BR 229, a measure which will be considered during Kentucky’s 2015 state legislative session.

kentucky-quarterIn recent days, rough-draft versions of Wilson’s latest proposal have surfaced, allowing a glimpse at the bill.  It’s touted as an attempt to ban so-called “internet cafe” gambling, but certain inclusions in the bill may open the door toward more broadly reaching bans against all forms of online gambling.  Wilson has been a longtime supporter of Kentucky’s anti-online gambling efforts, which first made international headlines back in 2008 when the state unsuccessfully attempted to seize 141 offshore internet domains connected to gambling.

Wilson pre-filed his BR 299 bill in mid-November, with news of the filing becoming public earlier this month via state media outlet WKBO.

Kentucky’s previous antagonistic history toward online gambling will likely play into the bill’s chances for success.  As Wilson acknowledged to WKBO, online gambling in the state remains a legal grey area, despite unsuccesfully trying to seize the online domains.  Kentucky later attached itself to the federal “Black Friday” case, but dropped its case (for some amount of cash from the PokerStars settlement).  Kentucky’s continuing involvement in the Black Friday case amounted to a nuisance lawsuit, since DOJ attorneys filed their own, well-documented motion that the earlier Kentucky seizure attempts were unconstitutional.

Nonetheless, the state has remained anti online gambling in general, in large supported by Kentucky’s prominent horseracing industry.  That includes the notable exception of Kentucky Derby owner Churchill Downs, Inc., which has made initial investments toward a place in the future online-gambling world.

Whichever side wins the state-level battle in Kentucky remains unknown.  However, here’s a look at a few key inclusions in the latest draft version of BR 229.

Here’s the clause which is aimed directly at the internet cafes, Section 1 (4) (b):

(b) Any mechanical or electronic device permanently located in a business establishment, including a private club, that is offered or made available to a person to play or participate in a simulated gambling program in return for direct or indirect consideration, including but not limited to consideration paid for Internet access or computer time, or a sweepstakes entry, which when operated may deliver as a result of the application of an element of chance, any money or property, or by the operation of which a person may become entitled to receive, as the result of the application of an element of chance, any money or property; or…

Onlookers might recognize the general similarity in the above to the Florida online-gambling ban that was enacted for the same reasons, ostensibly, the ban of internet cafes.  Indeed, as Wilson told WBKO, such internet cafes have, in his opinion, damaged the state’s established charitable-gaming operations.

“What they’ve done is they’ve taken away the charitable gaming from people like our veterans who are the VFW and the American Legion, which I’m a member there also,” Wilson told WBKO.  “As well as, the Knights of Columbus, it’s really hurt them big time.”

While exempting players and gamblers themselves, Wilson’s new bill includes categories of gaming such as bookmaking as being illegal under state law, unless done in accordance with Kentucky’s recognized venues (e.g. horse tracks).  A wide ranging fan against would-be business offerings in the state is dealt with under a definition of “profiting from gambling activity,” as follows:

“Profiting from gambling activity” — A person “profits from gambling activity” when, other than as a player, he accepts or receives or agrees to accept or receive money or other property pursuant to an agreement or understanding with any person whereby he participates or is to participate in the proceeds of gambling activity.

No dates have yet been set for initial consideration of Wilson’s bill.

Kentucky State Senator Mike Wilson (R-Bowling Green) has renewed his efforts to have internet cafe-style gambling banned in the Commonwealth by pre-filing the framework for BR 229, a measure which will be considered during Kentucky’s 2015 state legislative session.

kentucky-quarterIn recent days, rough-draft versions of Wilson’s latest proposal have surfaced, allowing a glimpse at the bill.  It’s touted as an attempt to ban so-called “internet cafe” gambling, but certain inclusions in the bill may open the door toward more broadly reaching bans against all forms of online gambling.  Wilson has been a longtime supporter of Kentucky’s anti-online gambling efforts, which first made international headlines back in 2008 when the state unsuccessfully attempted to seize 141 offshore internet domains connected to gambling.

Wilson pre-filed his BR 299 bill in mid-November, with news of the filing becoming public earlier this month via state media outlet WKBO.

Kentucky’s previous antagonistic history toward online gambling will likely play into the bill’s chances for success.  As Wilson acknowledged to WKBO, online gambling in the state remains a legal grey area, despite unsuccesfully trying to seize the online domains.  Kentucky later attached itself to the federal “Black Friday” case, but dropped its case (for some amount of cash from the PokerStars settlement).  Kentucky’s continuing involvement in the Black Friday case amounted to a nuisance lawsuit, since DOJ attorneys filed their own, well-documented motion that the earlier Kentucky seizure attempts were unconstitutional.

Nonetheless, the state has remained anti online gambling in general, in large supported by Kentucky’s prominent horseracing industry.  That includes the notable exception of Kentucky Derby owner Churchill Downs, Inc., which has made initial investments toward a place in the future online-gambling world.

Whichever side wins the state-level battle in Kentucky remains unknown.  However, here’s a look at a few key inclusions in the latest draft version of BR 229.

Here’s the clause which is aimed directly at the internet cafes, Section 1 (4) (b):

(b) Any mechanical or electronic device permanently located in a business establishment, including a private club, that is offered or made available to a person to play or participate in a simulated gambling program in return for direct or indirect consideration, including but not limited to consideration paid for Internet access or computer time, or a sweepstakes entry, which when operated may deliver as a result of the application of an element of chance, any money or property, or by the operation of which a person may become entitled to receive, as the result of the application of an element of chance, any money or property; or…

Onlookers might recognize the general similarity in the above to the Florida online-gambling ban that was enacted for the same reasons, ostensibly, the ban of internet cafes.  Indeed, as Wilson told WBKO, such internet cafes have, in his opinion, damaged the state’s established charitable-gaming operations.

“What they’ve done is they’ve taken away the charitable gaming from people like our veterans who are the VFW and the American Legion, which I’m a member there also,” Wilson told WBKO.  “As well as, the Knights of Columbus, it’s really hurt them big time.”

While exempting players and gamblers themselves, Wilson’s new bill includes categories of gaming such as bookmaking as being illegal under state law, unless done in accordance with Kentucky’s recognized venues (e.g. horse tracks).  A wide ranging fan against would-be business offerings in the state is dealt with under a definition of “profiting from gambling activity,” as follows:

“Profiting from gambling activity” — A person “profits from gambling activity” when, other than as a player, he accepts or receives or agrees to accept or receive money or other property pursuant to an agreement or understanding with any person whereby he participates or is to participate in the proceeds of gambling activity.

No dates have yet been set for initial consideration of Wilson’s bill.

Black River Falls Public Library has opened a new internet cafe to provide a space for personal computer use – and a cup of coffee, too.

The library last Tuesday held an open house for the new space, which is housed in the facility’s newly refurbished program room. BRF Public Library Director Tammy Peasley said the idea for the cafe comes from a desire to meet the needs of patrons who sometimes are looking for a bookstore-like experience.

“It’s just learning about the services of the library and meeting the needs of our current patrons and one of those is creating a place that is kind of a community space,” Peasley said. “So instead of having the perception of the library that it’s one where you don’t talk and everybody whispers – here’s a place where you can come and socialize.”

The library used about $9,000 in local grant funding and donations to finance the renovation of the program room, which now has hard flooring, new tables and chairs and a single-serving coffee maker so patrons can brew a cup and enjoy it while using the library’s wireless internet on their personal devices.

Peasley said the library in the past had allowed beverages, but it sometimes led to spilling on the carpeting. The internet cafe now can serve as the beverage-only space where patrons can pay $1.50 for a single-serving of coffee at the front desk and then also get the benefit of newly improved wireless internet access points to get web service on their own laptops, phones or other tablet-like devices in the cafe area.

BRF Library Board President Jay Eddy said the revamp of the program room is a welcome change and one that helps the local community provide a niche not otherwise available in the immediate area.

“The library board felt that it would be nice to take our conference room and give those people a place to go who are using the wireless type of thing and maybe take them out of the general area – and if they had a cup of coffee they could do that without being in the regular area of the library, too,” he said. “Not only can we bring that to the public and (we can) also make them aware of hopefully other library functions as well.

“I think that’s part of it – if you’re going to provide a service to the public, you should stay up to date with what the public is looking for.”

The addition of the internet cafe comes amid other recent revamps in the library like the addition of a teen-designated area and new children’s area. The facility also underwent a layout reconfiguration during a system-wide circulation system changeover. The new areas were part of an effort to give the library an “ambiance” that many facilities are looking to create, Peasley said.

“Each move was in response to a perceived need and an idea to provide services to the community,” she said. “The staff has been absolutely very supportive and involved in participating in the changes and from what I hear from staff and from patrons – the changes have been well received and appreciated.”

Eddy agreed.

“I think the changes have been awesome. We’ve taken a traditional library that was certainly functional but not as user-friendly as it could be and kind of updated it and made it more user friendly,” he said. “I hope everybody that is interested gets down there and takes a look at (the internet cafe). I think they’ll be really pleasantly surprised. That’s my big hope – that we keep people looking at our library as a great resource for the community.”

The program room will be used as the internet cafe unless there are scheduled events or programs scheduled for the room, Peasley said.

FREMONT – Authorities raided the city's only Internet cafe Thursday and are investigating it in connection with allegations of illegal gambling, an Ohio Attorney General's Office spokesman said.

Fremont police and the Ohio Attorney General's Office took machines used for skill games or sweepstakes from Talk N Win on South Fifth Street, said attorney general's spokesman Dan Tierney. No one has been charged.

"The investigation is ongoing, so it would be inappropriate to speculate on whether charges would be filed," Tierney said.

The attorney general's office and law enforcement agencies raided four other Talk N Win locations in Northwest Ohio and another Internet cafe in Oregon. Authorities had received reports that the businesses were giving cash payouts for skill games and sweepstakes in violation of Ohio law, Tierney said.

A makeshift "closed" sign was taped to the door of Talk N Win. Inside, the tables that once held computers were empty, and employees Bobby Boyd and Samantha Minich said they didn't know how the business could stay open after the raid.

"You think about your families and what they're going to do," said Boyd, who worked security for the business. "I wonder how they sleep knowing they took away somebody's Christmas and their livelihood. It's a hurt feeling.

"I wonder what I'm going to tell my grandkids."

Talk N Win used to be Player's Club and is owned by Marvin Dabish, who could not be reached. In August, Dabish told Fremont City Council he had 100 machines at Talk N Win.

Players Club and other Internet cafes in the city -- which no longer exist -- were raided in 2012 in connection with allegations of illegal gambling. In October 2013, a state law limiting winnings to prizes worth $10 took effect and caused most cafes to shut down.

The law made investigations like the ones being conducted easier, Tierney said.

"If they were paying out cash on a computer terminal, it was a prohibited action," he said.

Tierney declined to discuss how the attorney general's office became aware of the allegations against Talk N Win. In general, the attorney general's office works with law enforcement on investigations like this, he said.

Fremont police officials declined to comment.

Boyd said Talk N Win upgraded its computers to comply with Ohio law, and he said he did not understand why the businesses was raided. He and Minich said the business supported others in the area by ordering food for employees and customers.

Talk N Win had planned to be open Christmas night for customers to get together, they said.

"I totally feel like our stores are targeted," Boyd said. "This is where all the elderly people come. Everyone can't afford to go to the casinos."

mksmith@gannett.com

419-334-1044

Twitter: @kristinasmithNM

Article source: http://www.thenews-messenger.com/story/news/local/2014/12/18/state-local-authorities-raid-fremont-business/20589797/

New high-speed Internet cafes in Raqqa, Syria, the Islamic State group's stronghold, have been appearing lately, especially since March, when reliable wireless connections disappeared because of the regime's disruption of radio networks. Since then, people in the city, many of whom have lost their jobs after the Sunni militants took over the city, have started their own Internet cafes to make money. But now, the radical militants have started a new campaign to stop residents from using the Internet, forcing cafe owners to close their shops.

Wireless connection has been down in Raqqa since March, and residents have to resort to satellite connections to communicate with the outside world. The problem isn't just that this requires a computer hooked up to a satellite Internet connection, rather than a handheld device. It's also easily detectable not only by the Syrian regime, but by the ISIS leadership in Raqqa. 

According to a press statement published Tuesday by the activist group Raqqa is Being Silently Slaughtered, the group also known as ISIS or ISIL is threatening Internet users and warning them not to publish anything against the group online. ISIS has even set up surveillance cameras around the city in order to track people entering Internet cafes. 

Since it took over large swaths of land in Syria and Iraq in June, ISIS has fielded its own public relations team to disseminate information. The group often publishes polished online magazines, promoting its philosophy and strategies. It also has made several videos in an attempt to recruit militants to fight for them.

Until now, the creation of homemade Internet cafes had offered many residents in Raqqa a stable source of income. According to the statement, an example is that of one man in Raqqa who owns an Internet cafe and charges computer users by the hour. He relies on external transmitters to provide high-speed Internet service. He sells subscriptions to neighbors in Raqqa who want to access the Internet on a regular basis. The amount of megabytes offered in subscriptions differs from cafe to cafe.

Another man in Raqqa owns an Internet cafe with a total of 12 computers. His cafe is one of the most popular because it is located in the center of the city and offers the most reliable Internet. Raqqa experiences several hours of power outages a day, but this cafe has a backup generator that allows residents to use the Internet even when the electricity is out. Other cafes are not able to run their generators because the price of gasoline in the ISIS "caliphate" continues to increase.

ISIS often conducts raids and inspections of the cafes, also by hacking into the computers and investigating users' social networking profiles. In recent weeks the group has begun to arrest people for their statements online. The crackdown has forced several Internet cafes to shut down as the number of customers has significantly decreased.

Raqqa is Being Slaughtered Silently is still operating, it says, because it relies on Internet users located outside the stronghold. Other activists in the city, however, are now more limited than ever and have no way of communicating with anyone outside the city.

AMD hosted i-Cafe Conference in China on December 10, forming partnerships with hardware companies such as Foxconn Electronics (Hon Hai Precision Industry), Asustek Computer, Micro-Star International (MSI) and Sapphire, as well as China's Internet cafe players to expand into China's Internet cafe market.

With the China government having lifted several restrictions over Internet cafe operation, AMD expects the market's business opportunities to start growing rapidly.

The conference was attended by around 200 representatives from Internet cafes, software and hardware firms, as well as game designers. During the conference, AMD unveiled its latest technology and graphics card drivers such as the Catalyst Omega special edition specifically optimized for Internet cafe PCs and a Windows XP-compatible unified graphics card driver to help Internet cafe players save time on system adjustments and testing as well as reduce costs.

AMD and Foxconn also announced a jointly developed Internet cafe PC using AMD's eight-core FX8300 processor and R9 270/R7 260X graphics card.

AMD is also cooperating with an automatic driver upgrade software designer to assist related players to upgrade their PC's drivers automatically.

Currently, China's Internet cafe market has about 12 million PCs and the market has replacement demand for about four million units each year. In 2013, the market generated an overall income of CNY52 billion and attracted 119 million users.

AMD i-Cafe Conference in Beijing, China
Photo: Monica Chen, Digitimes, December 2014

Article source: http://www.digitimes.com/news/a20141211PD203.html