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By  Alan Johnson

The Columbus Dispatch Thursday September 19, 2013 7:41 AM

Enlarge Image Eamon Queeney | DISPATCH

Volunteers unload boxes of signatures for a referendum on House Bill 7 on Sept. 3. Their shirts tout a poll backing their cause.

A campaign to put an Internet-sweepstakes-cafe law to a public vote in Ohio appears to be falling far short of the number of valid signatures needed to put it on the November 2014 ballot.

Without enough signatures, House Bill 7, passed by the General Assembly and signed by Gov. John Kasich this year, will take effect immediately. It would eliminate cash payouts at Internet cafes and limit prizes to a value of $10, restrictions that owners say would snuff out their business.

The Committee to Protect Ohio Jobs, a group bankrolled by cafe owners and software companies, turned in 433,834 signatures on Sept. 3 to Secretary of State Jon Husted’s office. The committee needs 231,148 of those signatures to be valid. But The Dispatch did a spot check yesterday of boards of elections in Ohio’s largest counties and found they are running well under the validation rate needed to hold a referendum.

While all the signatures have not yet been verified, most county boards of elections, which do the checking, are nearly done, and the validation rate appears to be less than 40 percent statewide. Cafe backers needed a roughly 53 percent rate to have enough signatures.

The final tally by the Franklin County Board of Elections showed 33,585 valid signatures out of 86,284 checked, or

39 percent. The most-common reasons for invalid names were that a signer was not a registered voter or was not registered at the listed address.

The rates were running at 39 percent in Cuyahoga County, 27 percent in Hamilton County and

41 percent in Lucas County. Those four are the state’s largest counties, where petition circulators gathered the vast majority of signatures.

The percentage of valid signatures checked by The Dispatch in other counties: 55 percent in Summit and Stark counties, and 38 percent in Butler.

If the current trend holds true in the final count, cafe backers might need up to 90,000 more names to make the ballot.

The committee still has a chance to do that through a 10-day “cure” period to gather additional signatures after the first batch is tabulated.

Mark Weaver, a Columbus consultant and spokesman for the Committee to Protect Ohio Jobs, said the group has been “preparing for weeks to use the 10-day window to gather the remaining signatures.”

“Since polling shows that 80 percent of Ohioans oppose banning Internet-sweepstakes cafes, there are always people who are willing to sign these petitions. Our signature consultant has helped us qualify in several counties even without additional signatures. This effort continues.”

Weaver said he finds it “a bit odd that the counties with the lowest validation rates happen to be where the casinos are.” He did not elaborate.

The referendum campaign is being closely monitored statewide by an opposing group, Ohioans Against Illegal Gambling, backed by Ohio casinos, which see the cafes as competition. The group said by its calculation, the committee has less than 38 percent valid signatures and appears likely to get the necessary signatures in just seven counties instead of the 44 required.

“It’s not surprising to learn that the only people who really support these illegal gambling houses are their owners and their henchmen,” Ohioans Against Illegal Gambling spokesman Carlo LoParo said. “It seems voters were reluctant to give their real names and addresses to operatives of a criminal enterprise.”

Internet cafes, which have sprung up all over the state, offer slot-machine-style games played on computer terminals. Operators say their customers get something of value in exchange for their money — long-distance phone cards or Internet time.

The cafes have come under attack by Attorney General Mike DeWine and many law-enforcement officials who say the games are illegal gambling. Some cafes have been raided and shut down, but most remain open for business.

Dispatch reporter Alex Felser contributed to this story.

ajohnson@dispatch.com

@ohioaj

By AMY ROGAN

ThisWeek Community News Monday September 16, 2013 12:07 PM

Marysville City Council's public affairs committee is not seeing eye to eye with Mayor John Gore's administration on whether to extend the city's moratorium on regulating Internet sweepstakes cafes and skill-game rooms.

Council heard the first reading of an amended ordinance Thursday, Sept. 12, that would extend a moratorium that was first instituted -- at Gore's request -- in December 2011.

The public affairs committee worked for 10 months to design legislation regulating such businesses in the city. The ordinance to do so was approved a year ago this month.

Gore asked for the moratorium three months later, citing bills aimed at banning Internet cafes altogether in Ohio that were then making their way through the Ohio General Assembly.

Ohio lawmakers have continued to work on legislation to ban Internet cafes; however, the Committee to Protect Ohio Jobs is seeking a referendum vote in November 2014 to keep House Bill 7 from going into effect. Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted has directed county boards of election to complete the validation of signatures on the referendum petitions by Friday, Sept. 20.

Marysville City Administrator Terry Emery said all this activity at the state level is a sign Marysville should proceed with caution.

"There's so many things going on with the attorney general and looking into the legality of Internet cafes that we just think it's in our community's best interest to extend the moratorium until the state of Ohio and the attorney general have a chance to fully vet the issue," Emery told council.

He noted that due to recent events, he felt it would be in the city's best interest to take a step back and evaluate where to go in this particular area.

On Aug. 1, Marysville police, Union County sheriff's deputies and the Union County Prosecutor's Office executed search warrants and seized gaming terminals at Marysville Internet Cafe, 302 E. Fifth St.

City Law Director Tim Aslaner said that investigation is ongoing. Marysville Police Chief Floyd Golden said there have been no new developments in the case since the initial search.

Councilwoman Deborah Groat, chairwoman of the public affairs committee, said there is no animosity between the committee and the administration on the issue -- they just see things differently.

"We worked for about 10 months with people who owned and managed businesses in Marysville," Groat said. "We put great legislation into place. I see no reason not to use the legislation we have."

The committee voted 3-0 in August to not extend the moratorium, but since that vote was in direct opposition to the administration's position, Groat said she thought it would be best to take the issue to the full council for a vote.

A second reading of the am-ended ordinance is scheduled for council's Sept. 26 meeting.

Aslaner said there is nothing wrong with the city's existing legislation but he thinks there is still some debate concerning the legality of what's going on at Internet cafes or skill-game rooms.

Groat said Marysville has lost its three Internet sweep-stakes/gaming businesses over the last few months but there has been one application filed by a different owner for a new gaming-type business.

"If a business wants to come to Marysville and call themselves a gaming business and calls themselves legal according to the state of Ohio, let the state shut them down," she said. "We're not going to shut them down."

An Internet cafe owner accused of running illegal gambling operations in Yuba City has been charged in two misdemeanor criminal cases.

Sutter County prosecutors filed a two-count criminal complaint this week against Stephen A. Maki. In July, they filed a four-count misdemeanor complaint.

"They busted him the first time, and he opened up again," Assistant District Attorney Jana McClung said Friday in explaining the two cases.

Yuba City police served search warrants in March at the Bullseye Internet Cafe on Colusa Avenue and Coco's Internet More on Bridge Street.

The latest complaint alleges Maki violated the same gambling laws in May.

"I think now he's going to let it go through the court system, I hope," McClung said.

Maki was supposed to be arraigned in August in the first case but failed to appear and a warrant was issued for his arrest, according to Sutter County Superior Court records.

On Friday, Maki's lawyer, Linda Parisi, faxed a letter to Superior Court Judge Susan Green to explain her client's missed court appearance.

"Our office was in contact with the Sutter County District Attorney's Office regarding the prosecution of Mr. Maki prior to the court date," Parisi wrote. "Pursuant to our discussion, it was believed that the Sutter County District Attorney's Office had not begun its prosecution of Mr. Maki. We agreed to discuss the case once the reports were received."

She continued: "Unbeknown to us, at the time of our discussions, there were two cases being investigated against Mr. Maki for the same conduct. One of the prosecutions had already been filed. Despite the agreement between the parties, the case had already been filed and was on calendar. As a result of that mix-up, our office did not appear ..."

Maki now has an Oct. 7 court date in Sutter County.

Similar gambling charges are pending against Maki in Sacramento Court Superior Court. He is due in court on those charges in November.

CONTACT Harold Kruger at 749-4774.

Article source: http://www.appeal-democrat.com/articles/internet-127610-city-cafe.html

The Public Utility Regulatory Authority (PURA) on Tuesday held a first ever National consultative forum with Internet cafes operators and other stakeholders on the regulation of cyber cafes in the Gambia, at the Paradise Suites Hotel in Kololi. PURA under section 10 (1) (b) of the information and communications act 2009, is required to ensure that no person provides an information and communication services in the country without the prior authorisation of the authority. The objective of the guidelines is to provide a framework that governs the establishment, operation and maintenance of internet/cyber cafes and other similar establishments within the Gambia.

The primary objectives of the forum are to strengthen the protection of children online, regulation of the retail end of the internet and the power of collective barging for proprietors of internet café owners amongst others .

Solo Sima, director of Consumer affairs PURA, stressed that legal, technical and institutional challenges posed by the issues of cyber security are global and far-reaching and that can only be addressed through a coherent strategy taking into account the role of all actors, within a framework of collaborative efforts. He noted that the realisation of Vision 2020 to some extent is anchored on maximizing the catalytic role of ICT in socio-economic development. Sima added that ICT has become a strategic resource and the foundation of most economic activities both at individual and institutional level. He said some ten, twenty years ago, no one would have envisioned the level of advancement they are witnessing in ICT across the globe.

He further disclosed that a World Bank report indicated that for every 10 percent increase in broadband penetration, a country's economy grows by 2.5 to 3 percent. "ICT sector for example currently contributes 5 percent to the country's Gross Domestic Product, [and] this is a situation that the Gambia government would want to see improve for the better," he added. Sima said as aresut of the above mentioned operators have been issued international data gateway licenses to provide and offer broadband services, but he noted that access to internet and data services still requires further improvement in many parts of the country. Sompo Ceesay, the director of energy at PURA, stated that few months ago, certain internet cafes offer services which contravene some of the current policies. He further recalled that the matter prompted a press release from the utility regulator some time ago which was misunderstood by many and noted that with forums like this, they can discuss and address the issues amilcably.

"We felt that bringing [internet] cafes together- were many access their internet connection despite the penetration of mobile internets, is important," said Ceesay, adding that there is the need to prevent minors from accessing adults' sites on the net. Alasana Tunkara the Customer Care manager of Qcell stressed that running a cyber café is never been easy in the country and commended the operators for taking the business risk. He however reminded the cyber café operators to understand that PURA is working in the interest of everyone, hence the need for cyber café operators to be cautious of the regulatory measures in place.

China’s Internet cafés have long been the definition of man caves: dimly lit rooms filled mostly with young men blinking at glowing screens, many of them fervently engaged in such multiplayer online games as World of Warcraft, discarded soda bottles and candy wrappers tossed nearby. Such patrons pay hourly for Internet access and often stay late into the night. But the rise of smartphones and mobile gaming in China may soon make Internet parlors as obsolete as phone booths.

According to Niko Partners’ newly released “Chinese Mobile Games Market Report 2013,” China’s mobile game market—which netted $750 million in revenue in 2012—will grow to $1.2 billion in 2013. “Mobile games make up the fastest-growing segment in the Chinese games market and have taken market share from PC-based casual and social online gaming,” Kevin Hause, a senior partner at Niko Partners, said in a statement. The new report was produced in cooperation with Beijing’s Umeng Analytics.

In early 2012, only about 100 million smartphones had been activated in China. By the end of this year, Niko Partners, a research firm specializing in the Asian gaming market with offices in Shanghai and Silicon Valley, predicts that some 500 million smartphones will be in use in China. That figure shouldn’t surprise anyone who’s spent time lately in Chinese shopping malls, subways, even factories—where smartphones are already ubiquitous accessories for young people of widely varying incomes.

The rapid adoption of smartphones has been accelerated by the rise of cheap models marketed to the Chinese market. Currently, 61 percent of the smartphones purchased on Alibaba’s e-tail sites are models selling for less than 1000 renminbi (about $160). Xiaomi, a dynamic Beijing mobile company founded in 2010, sold 100,000 of its new Hongmi (“red rice”) model in just 90 seconds last month, when the phone was first released. The smartphone retails for 799 renminbi.

Xiaomi recently made headlines for poaching Hugo Barra, formerly vice president of Android product development at Google (GOOG), to spearhead the young company’s international business development. Chinese tech companies have so far been slow to find success abroad, but that may soon change. Shenzhen-based Tencent Holdings (700:HK) popular social-networking app, Weixin, is already the fifth most-used app in the world, with about 100 million users outside China.

View Slideshow Eamon Queeney | DISPATCH

Volunteers unload boxes of signatures for a referendum on House Bill 7. Their shirts tout a poll backing their cause.

By 
Alan Johnson

The Columbus Dispatch Wednesday September 4, 2013 6:40 AM

Opponents of a state law banning Internet sweepstakes cafes filed 433,834 signatures with Secretary of State Jon Husted yesterday, betting they have enough to put the issue to a vote in November 2014.

The Committee to Protect Ohio Jobs, a group bankrolled by cafe owners and software companies, needs about 53 percent of the submitted signatures validated to meet the 231,148 required to put a referendum on House Bill 7 on the ballot. If that happens, the Internet cafes — which offer slot-machine-style games played on computer terminals — will remain open until voters decide the issue in 14 months.

If they fall short after signatures are verified, cafe backers will get 10 days to gather more.

Committee spokesman Matt Dole called it a “citizen veto of House Bill 7” in the same way a 2011 referendum vote overturned a law passed to restrict collective-bargaining rights for public employees.

“We are for regulation. We’d like to get rid of the rogue operators,” said Robert Dabish, a Lucas County man and owner of more than 20 Players Club Internet Cafes across the state, including three in Columbus. “We are not what (Attorney General Mike DeWine) says we are. ... We are a good, clean establishment.”

Operators argue they are legal businesses offering customers phone cards or Internet time in exchange for the opportunity to play casino-style games and win prizes. Dabish said he employs 168 full- and part-time workers who, if the issue fails, “are going to be gone. They’re going to be out on the streets.”

The process to validate the petition is expected to take two to three weeks.

The cafes have come under attack by DeWine and many law-enforcement officials who say the games are illegal gambling. Some cafes have been raided and shut down, but most remain open for business.

House Bill 7, the law passed by the General Assembly and signed by Gov. John Kasich this year, would eliminate cash payouts and limit prizes to a value of $10. Cafe owners say that would snuff out their business.

The referendum is opposed by Ohioans Against Illegal Gambling, a group backed by Ohio casinos, which see the cafes as competition.

The referendum could be rendered moot by another bill approved in June by the Ohio Senate that would prohibit cafes from giving out prizes exceeding 5 percent of gross receipts. It includes an emergency clause, meaning it would take effect immediately and thus would not be subject to a referendum. The House is expected to begin debate on the bill this fall.

Dispatch Reporter Jim Siegel contributed to this story.

ajohnson@dispatch.com

@ohioaj

By  Alan Johnson

The Columbus Dispatch Thursday August 29, 2013 7:52 AM

The fate of Ohio’s Internet sweepstakes cafes is ready to be decided: either a new law probably puts them out of business, or they survive until November 2014, when voters make the call.

Opponents of House Bill 7, the state law cracking down on the Internet gaming operations, said yesterday that they expect to file more than 400,000 signatures on a petition aimed at preventing the law from taking effect as scheduled on Sept. 5. Mark Weaver, an attorney representing the Committee To Protect Ohio Jobs, said the group has far in excess of the 231,148 signatures of registered Ohio voters necessary to put the issue to a referendum in November 2014.

If enough signatures are ruled valid, the Internet cafes — which offer slot-machine-style games played on computer terminals — will remain open until after voters decide the issue at the general election next year.

Attorney General Mike DeWine and law-enforcement officials say the games are illegal gambling, and they have raided and shut down many cafes across the state.

If cafe backers fall short of the required number of signatures, they will get 10 additional days to collect the number needed.

The law passed by the General Assembly and signed by Gov. John Kasich this year would eliminate cash payouts and limit prizes to $10.

Cafe operators argue that they are legal businesses offering customers phone cards or Internet time in exchange for the opportunity to play casino-style games and win prizes. They say the law would snuff out their businesses.

Ohioans Against Illegal Gambling, a group backed by Ohio casinos, opposes a referendum.

“Over that past three months, we’ve observed Internet-cafe operatives mislead and, in some cases, flat-out lie to Ohioans about this petition effort,” spokesman Carlo LoParo said. “When scrutinized by county boards of elections, we expect a large share of their signatures will be found invalid.”

If the issue heads to the ballot next year, it could be a blockbuster during the gubernatorial-election campaign, pitting deep-pocketed interests — cafes versus casinos.

One of the cafe committee’s biggest contributors, according to state campaign records, is Brad Olah, owner of Innovative Gaming Corp., who previously has invested in a snowmobile-racing facility in his native Minnesota and precious-metal mines in China and South Africa. Olah gave the Ohio committee $350,000 earlier this year and has contributed hundreds of thousands of dollars to Internet-gaming campaign committees in Florida and South Carolina, records show.

The Ohio committee received $641,500 in contributions and spent nearly all of that on gathering signatures, according to the campaign report filed on July 31.

ajohnson@dispatch.com

@ohioaj

By  Alan Johnson

The Columbus Dispatch Thursday August 29, 2013 7:52 AM

The fate of Ohio’s Internet sweepstakes cafes is ready to be decided: either a new law probably puts them out of business, or they survive until November 2014, when voters make the call.

Opponents of House Bill 7, the state law cracking down on the Internet gaming operations, said yesterday that they expect to file more than 400,000 signatures on a petition aimed at preventing the law from taking effect as scheduled on Sept. 5. Mark Weaver, an attorney representing the Committee To Protect Ohio Jobs, said the group has far in excess of the 231,148 signatures of registered Ohio voters necessary to put the issue to a referendum in November 2014.

If enough signatures are ruled valid, the Internet cafes — which offer slot-machine-style games played on computer terminals — will remain open until after voters decide the issue at the general election next year.

Attorney General Mike DeWine and law-enforcement officials say the games are illegal gambling, and they have raided and shut down many cafes across the state.

If cafe backers fall short of the required number of signatures, they will get 10 additional days to collect the number needed.

The law passed by the General Assembly and signed by Gov. John Kasich this year would eliminate cash payouts and limit prizes to $10.

Cafe operators argue that they are legal businesses offering customers phone cards or Internet time in exchange for the opportunity to play casino-style games and win prizes. They say the law would snuff out their businesses.

Ohioans Against Illegal Gambling, a group backed by Ohio casinos, opposes a referendum.

“Over that past three months, we’ve observed Internet-cafe operatives mislead and, in some cases, flat-out lie to Ohioans about this petition effort,” spokesman Carlo LoParo said. “When scrutinized by county boards of elections, we expect a large share of their signatures will be found invalid.”

If the issue heads to the ballot next year, it could be a blockbuster during the gubernatorial-election campaign, pitting deep-pocketed interests — cafes versus casinos.

One of the cafe committee’s biggest contributors, according to state campaign records, is Brad Olah, owner of Innovative Gaming Corp., who previously has invested in a snowmobile-racing facility in his native Minnesota and precious-metal mines in China and South Africa. Olah gave the Ohio committee $350,000 earlier this year and has contributed hundreds of thousands of dollars to Internet-gaming campaign committees in Florida and South Carolina, records show.

The Ohio committee received $641,500 in contributions and spent nearly all of that on gathering signatures, according to the campaign report filed on July 31.

ajohnson@dispatch.com

@ohioaj

By  Alan Johnson

The Columbus Dispatch Thursday August 29, 2013 7:52 AM

The fate of Ohio’s Internet sweepstakes cafes is ready to be decided: either a new law probably puts them out of business, or they survive until November 2014, when voters make the call.

Opponents of House Bill 7, the state law cracking down on the Internet gaming operations, said yesterday that they expect to file more than 400,000 signatures on a petition aimed at preventing the law from taking effect as scheduled on Sept. 5. Mark Weaver, an attorney representing the Committee To Protect Ohio Jobs, said the group has far in excess of the 231,148 signatures of registered Ohio voters necessary to put the issue to a referendum in November 2014.

If enough signatures are ruled valid, the Internet cafes — which offer slot-machine-style games played on computer terminals — will remain open until after voters decide the issue at the general election next year.

Attorney General Mike DeWine and law-enforcement officials say the games are illegal gambling, and they have raided and shut down many cafes across the state.

If cafe backers fall short of the required number of signatures, they will get 10 additional days to collect the number needed.

The law passed by the General Assembly and signed by Gov. John Kasich this year would eliminate cash payouts and limit prizes to $10.

Cafe operators argue that they are legal businesses offering customers phone cards or Internet time in exchange for the opportunity to play casino-style games and win prizes. They say the law would snuff out their businesses.

Ohioans Against Illegal Gambling, a group backed by Ohio casinos, opposes a referendum.

“Over that past three months, we’ve observed Internet-cafe operatives mislead and, in some cases, flat-out lie to Ohioans about this petition effort,” spokesman Carlo LoParo said. “When scrutinized by county boards of elections, we expect a large share of their signatures will be found invalid.”

If the issue heads to the ballot next year, it could be a blockbuster during the gubernatorial-election campaign, pitting deep-pocketed interests — cafes versus casinos.

One of the cafe committee’s biggest contributors, according to state campaign records, is Brad Olah, owner of Innovative Gaming Corp., who previously has invested in a snowmobile-racing facility in his native Minnesota and precious-metal mines in China and South Africa. Olah gave the Ohio committee $350,000 earlier this year and has contributed hundreds of thousands of dollars to Internet-gaming campaign committees in Florida and South Carolina, records show.

The Ohio committee received $641,500 in contributions and spent nearly all of that on gathering signatures, according to the campaign report filed on July 31.

ajohnson@dispatch.com

@ohioaj

At 66 years old, Jerold Jaffe said he’s ‘flabbergasted’ to be facing up to 10 years in prison.

“He’s had maybe three traffic violations in his whole life,” said his son, David Jaffe.

The Sylvania resident was charged with operating an illegal gambling operation at the end of June after the Michigan Attorney General closed 59 internet cafes across the state, including Mr. Jaffe’s Lambertville store.

It may look like a casino —even act like one — but Mr. Jaffe insists that no gambling ever took place at his establishment, which was located along Secor Rd. near Consear Rd.

“From what my attorney tells me,” Mr. Jaffe said, “the definition of gambling in both Ohio and Michigan is that you have to put something of value up at risk based on a random event, like the turn of a card, the role of a dice, a horserace or a football game.”

“There is no money to be put up. You just play the games and if you win, you win.”

When a customer enters one of Mr. Jaffe’s cafes, they purchase a certain amount of time on the Internet. They are given a card that, when swiped, gains them access to a computer. Once the computer is activated, the customer is taken straight to a Google browser where a timer in the upper right-hand corner of the screen indicates how much time they have left online.

Should they decide to play the casino-style games, they simply click off the browser screen — causing the timer to freeze. They then can play games for as long as they wish and win a predetermined amount of money.

“No purchase is necessary — like Publishers Clearing House,” Mr. Jaffe said. “The games are pre-set, therefore where the law says ‘random event’ this is not a random event.”

The strategy for determining the amount won is posted right there in the store. In fact, customers don’t even have to play the games in order to win the money.

“Some people will come in and say, ‘Hey, I want $5 of Internet time — tell me how much money I win.’ And they get (the money) right there,” said David, who acts as a regional manager for the business. “Some people do come in just to use the Internet, but almost everybody checks to see how much they have won.”

“This is a place that promotes sweepstakes. It’s a new thing, and I can see why they took a second look at us. But it’s the same as the sweepstakes you get in the mail,” David said.

The Jaffes said when they opened, they met with local officials to inform them of the business’ plans and the township had no problem with them opening. Later, they employed Temperance attorney Tim Churchill to look into the issue further. Mr. Churchill said he met with the Monroe County prosecutor and was told no one at that time had been criminally charged for the activity.

“We did not just go in and open up these stores,” David said. “We were looking for a reason not to open up, but they couldn’t find one.”

They continued operating for two years under the assumption that if they were to receive a cease-and-desist order from the State of Michigan, they would close their doors immediately. That letter never came, and Mr. Jaffe said he was shocked to receive a phone call that his cafe was being raided.

“They took all of the equipment,” Mr. Jaffe said. “They took $61,000 out of our bank accounts. And they said that we were breaking the law. They closed about 60 other stores that all go letter of cease-and-desist.”

“I don’t think it’s fair. I had permission from everyone to open. I would have closed on a minute’s notice had they told me to.”

Mr. Jaffe went to the cafe while it was being raided and told the police he was the owner — which led to him being charged in the crime. His 30-year-old nephew, Jacob Jaffe, was working at the store when police showed up. He also was charged.

“I walked in and said ‘I’m the owner, I’ll answer any questions — we’re not doing anything illegal here,’” Mr. Jaffe said. “I was grilled by the state police and answered every one of their questions.”

That same day, the Jaffes closed their Adrian cafe as well before it was raided by police. Now, they have customers from Bedford and Adrian coming to their Toledo store, where the sweepstakes — for now — are still legal.

Mr. Jaffe and his nephew are still amid court proceedings in the case. Mr. Churchill said he is currently negotiating with the Attorney General for a resolution, but nothing has been determined.

“The cops told me I was a standup guy because they usually have to chase the owner out the back door,” Mr. Jaffe said. “I said ‘That’s because you raid places that are illegal — I’m doing nothing wrong.’”

Article source: http://www.monroenews.com/news/2013/aug/27/bedford-township-internet-cafe-operator-says-no-ga/