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FOUR CORNERS — As part of a month-long undercover investigation, the Lake County Sheriff's Office raided two Internet cafes Monday, seizing $14,000 in cash.

Detectives had received Crimeline tips about possible illegal gambling at Fun Time and Sweepstakes, two businesses about a quarter of a mile apart on U.S. Highway 27, Sgt. Jim Vachon said. The Sheriff's Office also seized 40 computers, 60 monitors and two televisions.

"At this time the two businesses do not appear to be owned by the same individual(s)," Vachon wrote in an email. "Our detectives will be following up with the State Attorney's Office regarding appropriate charges once the investigation has been fully completed."

No arrests have been made, Vachon said.

In recent years, Florida law officers have focused on Internet cafes, creating the Illegal Gaming Task Force this year to crack down on gambling locations in Seminole, Lake and Brevard counties.

In a separate FDLE investigation, the Illegal Gaming Task Force raided another location in Clermont called Sweepstakes on April 3 and Oct. 2, spokeswoman Samantha Andrews said. That business, on County Road 455, also went by the name Cyber Center/PD Inc. of Orange Park.

echerney@tribune.com or 352-742-5930

Copyright © 2014, Orlando Sentinel

Article source: http://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/breaking-news/os-lk-internet-cafe-raid-20141202-story.html

An armed gunman walked into the South Main Internet cafe Thursday night and demanded money from an employee, but ran out without his gun.

Salisbury Police say the incident occurred just before 10 p.m. at 917 S. Main St. in a tiny sweepstakes cafe just on the other side of Rick’s Barbecue and Grill. There were customers in the store when the man entered. He is described as a black male, wearing a bandanna across his face with jeans and a dark coat.

He ordered everyone to get on the ground and went straight to the counter. He pointed the gun at the employee and demanded she give him the money.

Police Capt. Shelia Lingle said the employee was nervous and dropped the money on the floor. She picked it up as he walked around and made everyone get on the floor.

He didn’t have a bag and began grabbing for the money. He dropped the money, placed the gun on the counter and bent down to pick it up. The employee picked up the gun and fired it, missing the robber as he ran out of the store. He was able to take $715 from the business. He left behind his gun, a Rossi .38 Special.

This comes on the heels of a letter Police Chief Rory Collins delivered this week to Internet Sweepstakes cafes. In the letter Collins explains the business is in violation of the N.C. General Statute making it a criminal offense to have an electronic machine or device for the purpose of sweepstakes.

He goes on to write on or after Jan. 1 the police department will enforce the law on anyone involved in activity that goes against the statute. He’s allowing them a “grace period” in order to make provisions to cease. If the businesses remain open, Collins said it could result in confiscating the equipment.

“This is the only notice you will receive from my office prior to our taking enforcement action under G.S. 14-306.4,” the letter ended.

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China Internet Rules

(Photo : Reuters / Nir Elias) A woman uses a computer in an internet cafe at the centre of Shanghai January 13, 2010.

With more Chinese consumers connecting to the Internet via smartphones or their personal computers every year, internet cafes in China are struggling to find success and must break the law just to be able to stay afloat, TechinAsia reports.

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Mr. Zhang, owner of Hainan Internet café, first opened his business ten years ago and says things have drastically changed for the worse. Zhang told a newspaper reporter that the only thing keeping these businesses from closing down is to allow kids in and play video games.

There were a total of over 10,000 Internet cafes that struggled to bring in revenue and needed to be shut down between 2011 and 2012 alone.

"These days business is bad for every internet cafe," Zhang said. "If you don't let kids in to play games, then basically you can't make any money at all."

However, by doing so, business owners run the risk of crossing paths with the government, as Chinese law prohibits any minors from being able to enter Internet cafes.

Owners are supposed to register the actual identity of each person that uses their services, but loopholes allow kids to use the Internet and play video games. One could easily get a hold of registered IDs downloaded from the Internet and could even use one ID for multiple computers.

The Chinese government is aware of what is going on and will reportedly be implementing new measures in efforts to keep kids out of Internet cafes. Under the new measures, no Internet café will be allowed within 200 meters of a school.   

Zhang claims he used to follow the law, but after seeing most of the other Internet cafes close down, he realized the only way he has a chance of staying in business is to continue allowing minors to use his services, even if it's during school hours.

"You can't offend the students who come frequently," Zhang reasoned. "They're connected to all of their classmates, so if you try to restrict one of them, a lot of other 'business' will disappear along with that one."

Article source: http://www.chinatopix.com/articles/24792/20141128/chinese-internet-cafes-must-break-the-law-to-stay-in-business.htm


china-internet-cafe

If you’re an internet cafe owner in China, you’ve probably had a rough couple of years. As more and more of China’s adults get connected via their smartphones and personal PCs, interest in internet cafes is down. Between 2011 and 2012, for example, 10,000 internet cafes in China shut down. And things haven’t improved since.

That’s what Hainan internet cafe owner Mr. Zhang told a newspaper reporter in a recent story about the difficulty of operating an internet cafe these days. Business is much worse than ten years ago when he first started, Zhang said. And what’s keeping him and many other Chinese internet cafes afloat is illegal. Said Zhang:

These days business is bad for every internet cafe. If you don’t let kids in to play games, then basically you can’t make any money at all.

That’s a controversial statement because legally speaking, internet cafes are not supposed to admit minors. They are required to register the real identity of everyone who goes online, but Zhang said there are plenty of ways around that. You can simply swipe the same ID card for multiple computers, for example, or download IDs from the internet and register them.

See: A disgusting fact about internet cafes in China (and probably everywhere else)

Zhang said that he used to follow the regulations himself, but his business started dying, and he was forced to follow the example of other local netcafes, turning a blind eye as kids came in – even during school hours – to surf the web and play games. He knows he’s probably hurting the educations of some children, he said, “but I do it for the sake of surviving; there’s nothing else I can do except [allow kids in].” And even when kids come in during school hours to play, he says he can’t chase them off:

You can’t offend the students who come frequently. They’re connected to all of their classmates, so if you try to restrict one of them, a lot of other ‘business’ will disappear along with that one.

But even as owners like Zhang break the law, China’s government continues to attempt to keep kids out of internet cafes via new regulations. The latest measures include a number of revised regulations and a brand new one: no internet cafes will be allowed within 200 meters of primary, middle, and high schools.

A quick peek at Google Maps revealed that this may lead to the shutdown of a couple of internet cafes, but probably won’t have much effect on whether or not kids can get to internet cafes. One elementary school in Harbin I checked, for example, had just a couple internet cafes within 200 meters but at least 11 within 500 meters, which is still just a couple minutes’ walk away:

schools-internet-cafes

More or less everyone agrees that the current situation isn’t great for kids, but a decade of regulation clearly hasn’t worked. In the end, it may be that China’s internet cafes will be outdone by a growing middle class that can afford smartphones for their kids and computers at home for gaming. But especially in less-developed areas, those days are still a long way off. For now, minors are likely to remain the top customers at China’s internet cafes, despite the fact that they’re not supposed to be there.

Article source: https://www.techinasia.com/chinas-internet-cafes-money-break-law/

An armed gunman walked into the South Main Internet cafe Thursday night and demanded money from an employee, but ran out without his gun.

Salisbury Police say the incident occurred just before 10 p.m. at 917 S. Main St. in a tiny sweepstakes cafe just on the other side of Rick’s Barbecue and Grill. There were customers in the store when the man entered. He is described as a black male, wearing a bandanna across his face with jeans and a dark coat.

He ordered everyone to get on the ground and went straight to the counter. He pointed the gun at the employee and demanded she give him the money.

Police Capt. Shelia Lingle said the employee was nervous and dropped the money on the floor. She picked it up as he walked around and made everyone get on the floor.

He didn’t have a bag and began grabbing for the money. He dropped the money, placed the gun on the counter and bent down to pick it up. The employee picked up the gun and fired it, missing the robber as he ran out of the store. He was able to take $715 from the business. He left behind his gun, a Rossi .38 Special.

This comes on the heels of a letter Police Chief Rory Collins delivered this week to Internet Sweepstakes cafes. In the letter Collins explains the business is in violation of the N.C. General Statute making it a criminal offense to have an electronic machine or device for the purpose of sweepstakes.

He goes on to write on or after Jan. 1 the police department will enforce the law on anyone involved in activity that goes against the statute. He’s allowing them a “grace period” in order to make provisions to cease. If the businesses remain open, Collins said it could result in confiscating the equipment.

“This is the only notice you will receive from my office prior to our taking enforcement action under G.S. 14-306.4,” the letter ended.

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An armed gunman walked into the South Main Internet cafe Thursday night and demanded money from an employee, but ran out without his gun.

Salisbury Police say the incident occurred just before 10 p.m. at 917 S. Main St. in a tiny sweepstakes cafe just on the other side of Rick’s Barbecue and Grill. There were customers in the store when the man entered. He is described as a black male, wearing a bandanna across his face with jeans and a dark coat.

He ordered everyone to get on the ground and went straight to the counter. He pointed the gun at the employee and demanded she give him the money.

Police Capt. Shelia Lingle said the employee was nervous and dropped the money on the floor. She picked it up as he walked around and made everyone get on the floor.

He didn’t have a bag and began grabbing for the money. He dropped the money, placed the gun on the counter and bent down to pick it up. The employee picked up the gun and fired it, missing the robber as he ran out of the store. He was able to take $715 from the business. He left behind his gun, a Rossi .38 Special.

This comes on the heels of a letter Police Chief Rory Collins delivered this week to Internet Sweepstakes cafes. In the letter Collins explains the business is in violation of the N.C. General Statute making it a criminal offense to have an electronic machine or device for the purpose of sweepstakes.

He goes on to write on or after Jan. 1 the police department will enforce the law on anyone involved in activity that goes against the statute. He’s allowing them a “grace period” in order to make provisions to cease. If the businesses remain open, Collins said it could result in confiscating the equipment.

“This is the only notice you will receive from my office prior to our taking enforcement action under G.S. 14-306.4,” the letter ended.

Comments

comments

An armed gunman walked into the South Main Internet cafe Thursday night and demanded money from an employee, but ran out without his gun.

Salisbury Police say the incident occurred just before 10 p.m. at 917 S. Main St. in a tiny sweepstakes cafe just on the other side of Rick’s Barbecue and Grill. There were customers in the store when the man entered. He is described as a black male, wearing a bandanna across his face with jeans and a dark coat.

He ordered everyone to get on the ground and went straight to the counter. He pointed the gun at the employee and demanded she give him the money.

Police Capt. Shelia Lingle said the employee was nervous and dropped the money on the floor. She picked it up as he walked around and made everyone get on the floor.

He didn’t have a bag and began grabbing for the money. He dropped the money, placed the gun on the counter and bent down to pick it up. The employee picked up the gun and fired it, missing the robber as he ran out of the store. He was able to take $715 from the business. He left behind his gun, a Rossi .38 Special.

This comes on the heels of a letter Police Chief Rory Collins delivered this week to Internet Sweepstakes cafes. In the letter Collins explains the business is in violation of the N.C. General Statute making it a criminal offense to have an electronic machine or device for the purpose of sweepstakes.

He goes on to write on or after Jan. 1 the police department will enforce the law on anyone involved in activity that goes against the statute. He’s allowing them a “grace period” in order to make provisions to cease. If the businesses remain open, Collins said it could result in confiscating the equipment.

“This is the only notice you will receive from my office prior to our taking enforcement action under G.S. 14-306.4,” the letter ended.

Comments

comments

china computerAlexander F. Yuan/APA man uses a computer at an internet cafe in central Beijing, China, Friday, Dec. 28, 2012

Chinese officials called on Wednesday for controls on the Internet to preserve stability, saying its model for cyberspace regulation can be the framework for spawning commercial successes like Alibaba Group Holding Ltd.

The comments, made at the start of the World Internet Conference (WIC), show China is unlikely to loosen its tight grip on the medium even as it has begun a transformation of its economic model.

"This place is crowded with tourists, who are perfectly orderly, and cyberspace should also be free and open, with rules to follow and always following the rule of law," Lu Wei, China's Internet chief and director of the State Internet Information Office, said at the conference.

Lu was referring to China's eastern tourist town of Wuzhen, roughly 75 miles from Shanghai, which is hosting the three-day conference.

Among those attending the conference were executives from Apple Inc, Facebook Inc, LinkedIn Corp, IBM Corp , Microsoft Corp, Qualcomm Inc, SoftBank Corp, Cisco Systems Inc, Amazon.com Inc, Nokia, Intel Corp and Thomson Reuters Corp.

They already got a taste of China's intent when on Tuesday the Chinese government blocked access to a swathe of websites in what an Internet monitoring group said was a blunt censorship campaign.

With a population of 1.4 billion and 632 million people online, China is a market no one wants to miss out on. But

it also has the world's most sophisticated online censorship system, known outside the country as the Great Firewall.

It blocks many social media services, such as Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Instagram, Snapchat and Google, along with many rights groups sites and some foreign media agencies.

China's own Internet firms have seen huge success on their home turf. Alibaba, which made a record-breaking $25 billion listing in New York earlier this year, Tencent Holdings Ltd and Baidu Inc are together worth more than $500 billion in market capitalization. All three of China's biggest Internet companies were in attendance at the conference.

"The Internet is a double-edged sword," said State Council Vice Premier Ma Kai at the conference.

"Well used, it's Alibaba's treasure. Poorly used, it's Pandora's box. Cyber security is a shared challenge faced by human society. Effectively dealing with it is a shared responsibility for all governments," said Ma.

(Additional reporting by Beijing Newsroom; Editing by Muralikumar Anantharaman)

This article originally appeared at Reuters. Copyright 2014. Follow Reuters on Twitter.

Article source: http://www.businessinsider.com/r-china-says-controls-on-internet-needed-to-maintain-stability-2014-11

At Occidental Video and Internet Cafe, anachronistic evidence of the great digital divide is everywhere.

It’s in the cafe’s dusty computers rented out to locals for $4 an hour ($2 for students) to access broadband Internet service. And it’s in the musty shelves of DVD movies and blockbuster cable shows city-dwellers can watch at home or stream on HBO Go or Netflix.

Maleika Dance, an area resident who works at the cafe and video store, said many customers use the Internet cafe because they do not have access to broadband services at home.

Danny Candib, the owner of the cafe, said some people come in to maintain their website, check their Facebook page or conduct online banking. The Internet, Candib said, is as important today as electricity was generations ago.

“There are some people who are forced to come in and use it,” Candib said.

That’s a familiar story for many rural residents on the North Coast, where the farther you get from Highway 101, the fewer options you have for actively participating in the 21st century.

A recent survey by the U.S. Census Bureau tells that story.

According to the census survey, which was released last week, the Santa Rosa metropolitan area has among the highest rates of broadband use in California and the rest of the country.

But the bad news in Sonoma County is if you don’t live near Highway 101, you might as well live in Mississippi or other Deep South communities where high-speed Internet access is a luxury.

The survey did not include metro areas with populations smaller than 65,000 people, so it does not contain statistics for places like Occidental, Freestone or Cazadero.

In Ukiah, 82 percent of households have a computer, but just under 65 percent of residents in the Mendocino County seat have high-speed broadband Internet service, according to the survey.

That statistic is comparable to the Jackson metro area in Mississippi, where 64.2 percent of households have broadband. In fact, the nation’s lowest state averages for broadband use are in Mississippi, at 62.3 percent, and Arkansas, with 65.7 percent.

California has a state average of 77.4 percent, while the national average is 72.9 percent.

“This is yet another study reinforcing the ‘digital divide,’ ” said Brian Churm, technical chair of the Broadband Alliance of Mendocino County.

Churm said that rural communities in the North Coast are all too familiar with this divide, where “fast Internet is available to those who live in cities and can afford it.”

In the Santa Rosa metro area, which includes Petaluma, 81.3 percent of households have broadband Internet service. That’s comparable to other high-penetration broadband metro areas in the state, such as San Francisco (82.5 percent), Napa (82.8 percent) and Santa Cruz-Watsonville (82.4 percent).

As expected, at 86 percent the metro area defined by San Jose, Santa Clara and Sunnyvale has the highest average household broadband penetration.

For years, the Broadband Alliance has been working with other North Coast groups to improve and make available high-speed Internet services in rural and coastal communities.

Earlier this year, an ambitious 16-county, $138 million project for expanding broadband service to about 150,000 rural California households failed to get necessary funding from the state Public Utilities Commission.

The Golden Bear Broadband proposal, nearly three years in the making, would have benefited 3,520 households in Sonoma and Mendocino counties. That project has been replaced by a smaller effort that has brought together broadband advocates from Sonoma, Marin, Napa and Mendocino counties.

Over the summer, Sonoma County supervisors signed off on the partnership, whose first step was to map out each county’s priority areas that lack reliable Internet service.

Sonoma County’s priority areas include Cazadero, Jenner, Sea Ranch, Dry Creek Valley and the Joy Road community just west of Occidental. In Marin County, priority areas include Muir Beach, Point Reyes Station, Stinson Beach and Nicasio.

The new project, known as the North Bay North Coast Broadband Consortium, is documenting who has broadband and who doesn’t in an effort to encourage providers to build out broadband infrastructure in these areas.

“The Internet is used for so many things, even applying to jobs or social or government services,” said Barbara Thornton, who sits on the Marin Broadband Task Force, which is part of the consortium.

Michael Nicholls, co-chairman of Access Sonoma Broadband, the county’s representative in the consortium, said the government needs to recognize that broadband Internet service is as important today as the telephone was for most of the 20th century.

Title II oversight mandating that telephone service be provided to rural areas was part of the 1934 Communications Act passed by Congress. The same act formed the Federal Communications Commission. Internet service has been deregulated since the Telecommunications Act of 1996 and doesn’t fall under Title II oversight.

High-speed Internet advocates such as Nicholls have been arguing that broadband service be included in Title II regulation. That would give the California Public Utilities Commission the ability to mandate that broadband be extended to rural areas, Nicholls said. President Barack Obama recently announced that he supported reclassifying Internet service under Title II.

“These are not isolated communities,” Nicholls said. “These communities have been there for 150 years, but the technology just passed them by.”

You can reach Staff Writer Martin Espinoza at 521-5213 or martin.espinoza@pressdemocrat.com. On Twitter @renofish.

Gewalt ist keine Lösung. Schon gar nicht wegen einem Spiel. Und wegen Call of Duty schon mal überhaupt nicht. Doch da hatten zwei Thailänder wohl eine gänzlich andere Meinung zu.

Screenshot zu: Thailänder prügeln sich im Internet-Cafe wegen Call of Duty'Call of Duty'-Trolle seht euch vor, manche kommen tatsächlich vorbeiDie Situation dürften die meisten kennen, die gerne mal online spielen, egal ob nun Shooter, Strategie, Sportspiel, Rennspiel oder MMOs. Irgendjemand ist entweder am Trollen oder cheatet. In Shootern wird das Campen, also das Verharren an einem günstigen Punkt, um Gegnern aufzulauern, gerne als eine Art "Cheat", zumindest aber als unhöfliche Geste gesehen. "Camper" hat dabei denselben Stellenwert wie "Cheater".

Bricht dabei unter Umständen auch noch eine Diskussion aus, die in Beleidigungen ausartet, lehnt sich der ein oder andere Troll auch schon gerne mal weit aus dem Fenster, und teilt seinem Kontrahenten mit, wo er ihn finden könne, und dass er sich nicht vor einer Auseinandersetzung fürchtet. In 99 Prozent der Fälle bleibt es dabei. Nach der Runde geht jeder seines Weges. Nicht so in diesem Fall in Thailand. Dort verlangten Mitspieler, dass ein Spieler mit dem Campen aufhören soll, woraufhin er entgegnete, "Ich chille im Quan Lon Cafe, wenn jemand ein Problem hat."

Und jemand hatte damit ein Problem, wie das Video der Überwachungskamera beweist. Glücklicherweise konnten die Streithähne schließlich voneinander getrennt werden. Bis auf Blessuren und einer beleidigten Ehre wird hier wohl nicht viel passiert sein.

Sagt jemandem, den ihr gerade online getrollt und beleidigt habt, also niemals, wo er euch finden kann. Die Person könnte tatsächlich mal zu einem "Pläuschen" vorbeikommen.

Ein weiteres Video

Article source: http://www.gamona.de/games/aktuelles,thailaender-pruegeln-sich-im-internet-cafe-wegen-call-of:news,2561830.html