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Survivors of super Typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan) in Palawan nearly two years ago will benefit from more than 200 houses being built by Bahrain.

The Bahrain Red Crescent Society (BRCS) is heading the $2-million project in the province, Gulf Daily News reported.

Aside from the 213 houses, the project includes a vocational training center for residents to learn new skills, the report said.

BRCS secretary-general Dr. Fawzi Ameen said the project was funded by Bahrain’s Royal Charity Organization, as part of an agreement with the Philippine Red Cross.

“The project of building the shelter homes and a vocational center in Palawan is on track and should be completed by the yearend,” he told GDN.

But he said this was one of the most challenging projects the BRCS had undertaken. He said tribal communities are scattered in remote islands.

“I have to travel by plane, bus and then a boat to reach one of the areas where shelter is being built,” he said.

Yolanda tore through the Visayas in November 2013, leaving more than 6,300 dead.

Bahrain took part in the international community's response to help survivors recover from the disaster.

Stronger houses

Ameen said they need to build houses with strong materials that are more resistant to typhoons and heavy rainfall.

“We are using concrete blocks to support the timber and plywood upper structure of the house,” he said, adding a toilet is built outside.

Internet cafe

Meanwhile, Ameen said they plan to set up an Internet cafe to connect remote villages to the rest of the world.

“Some young men and women who studied in cities have a different outlook and when they return to their village they have no Internet,” he said. — Joel Locsin/LBG, GMA News

Survivors of super Typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan) in Palawan nearly two years ago will benefit from more than 200 houses being built by Bahrain.

The Bahrain Red Crescent Society (BRCS) is heading the $2-million project in the province, Gulf Daily News reported.

Aside from the 213 houses, the project includes a vocational training center for residents to learn new skills, the report said.

BRCS secretary-general Dr. Fawzi Ameen said the project was funded by Bahrain’s Royal Charity Organization, as part of an agreement with the Philippine Red Cross.

“The project of building the shelter homes and a vocational center in Palawan is on track and should be completed by the yearend,” he told GDN.

But he said this was one of the most challenging projects the BRCS had undertaken. He said tribal communities are scattered in remote islands.

“I have to travel by plane, bus and then a boat to reach one of the areas where shelter is being built,” he said.

Yolanda tore through the Visayas in November 2013, leaving more than 6,300 dead.

Bahrain took part in the international community's response to help survivors recover from the disaster.

Stronger houses

Ameen said they need to build houses with strong materials that are more resistant to typhoons and heavy rainfall.

“We are using concrete blocks to support the timber and plywood upper structure of the house,” he said, adding a toilet is built outside.

Internet cafe

Meanwhile, Ameen said they plan to set up an Internet cafe to connect remote villages to the rest of the world.

“Some young men and women who studied in cities have a different outlook and when they return to their village they have no Internet,” he said. — Joel Locsin/LBG, GMA News

Article source: http://www.gmanetwork.com/news/story/528366/news/regions/bahrain-building-200-houses-internet-cafe-for-yolanda-survivors-in-palawan

Netclix at 3575 West Dunlap Avenue was raided on Wednesday, its owner arrested in connection with an illegal gambling operation.

The Arizona Department of Gaming and Phoenix police raided a Phoenix Internet cafe on Wednesday, arresting the manager in connection with an illegal gambling operation.

Bradley John Babinski Jr., 28, was arrested after 1 p.m. Wednesday following an investigation of Netclix Internet Cafe at 3575 West Dunlap Avenue where undercover officers observed illegal activity on several visits. Several other people were arrested during the raid on unrelated warrants or drug charges.

Bradley John Babinski Jr.

Wednesday's raid also followed a May 24 robbery of the cafe that is still unsolved. In that case, police told one news outlet that "it was an odd place to hold up." Phoenix Police Sergeant Derek Elmore told Fox 10 News (KSAZ-TV) that the robber possibly "had some inside knowledge about what kind of money they had on hand there . . . or what kind of money they produce on hand . . . or maybe he's a former employee."

Whoever committed the robbery, the crime seems to put the cafe on the state gaming department's radar.

On June 10, gaming inspectors checked out Netclix and served Babinski with a notice that his business was conducting illegal gaming. After that, undercover officers went into Netclix on June 15, 16, and 18 and reportedly observed that the illegal activity was continuing.

Numerous computers and other evidence was seized during Wednesday's raid, effectively shutting down the business for now.

Customers of Netclix would pay the employee on duty to purchase Internet time, records state.

"The Internet time is used to play casino games and sweepstakes," says Babinski's booking sheet. "These games pay out money for winnings. Thus the customer pays money to play unregulated games with the expectation of winning money."

Now, maybe you're thinking, "do they mean an unregulated game for prizes like the upcoming U.S. Open Chess Championship?" We know poker advocate John Schnaubelt must be wondering that. But following a formal complaint last month by Schnaubelt about the chess match, in which players buy in for the chance of receiving cash prizes, the gaming department decided to do nothing. Amanda Jacinto of the gaming department told New Times for our June 15 article on Schnaubelt's attempted trouble-making that her agency believes the 116th annual chess event "doesn't rise to a level where it needs an investigation."

Internet cafes and off-reservation poker rooms where people can get their gambling jones obviously do rise to the level where investigations are needed, though. 

We called Jacinto for comment on the Netclix case — we'll let you know what she says if she calls back. We also left a message for Phoenix police.

One important question still unanswered by authorities is who owns this business and the level of suspected involvement by the owner. State records have no official filings on Netclix.

UPDATE: 1pm — Sergeant Jonathan Howard of the PPD got back to us, (though we still haven't heard from the gaming department.) Here's what Howard told us:

"Ray, I do not know who the owners of the business are but I can assure you that our investigation into the enterprise in continuing. The original contact with the business regarding the criminal activity occurred after May 24th. I have not seen an update regarding the arrest of anyone involved in the earlier robbery at this location."

Netclix at 3575 West Dunlap Avenue was raided on Wednesday, its owner arrested in connection with an illegal gambling operation.

The Arizona Department of Gaming and Phoenix police raided a Phoenix Internet cafe on Wednesday, arresting the manager in connection with an illegal gambling operation.

Bradley John Babinski Jr., 28, was arrested after 1 p.m. Wednesday following an investigation of Netclix Internet Cafe at 3575 West Dunlap Avenue where undercover officers observed illegal activity on several visits. Several other people were arrested during the raid on unrelated warrants or drug charges.

Bradley John Babinski Jr.

Wednesday's raid also followed a May 24 robbery of the cafe that is still unsolved. In that case, police told one news outlet that "it was an odd place to hold up." Phoenix Police Sergeant Derek Elmore told Fox 10 News (KSAZ-TV) that the robber possibly "had some inside knowledge about what kind of money they had on hand there . . . or what kind of money they produce on hand . . . or maybe he's a former employee."

Whoever committed the robbery, the crime seems to put the cafe on the state gaming department's radar.

On June 10, gaming inspectors checked out Netclix and served Babinski with a notice that his business was conducting illegal gaming. After that, undercover officers went into Netclix on June 15, 16, and 18 and reportedly observed that the illegal activity was continuing.

Numerous computers and other evidence was seized during Wednesday's raid, effectively shutting down the business for now.

Customers of Netclix would pay the employee on duty to purchase Internet time, records state.

"The Internet time is used to play casino games and sweepstakes," says Babinski's booking sheet. "These games pay out money for winnings. Thus the customer pays money to play unregulated games with the expectation of winning money."

Now, maybe you're thinking, "do they mean an unregulated game for prizes like the upcoming U.S. Open Chess Championship?" We know poker advocate John Schnaubelt must be wondering that. But following a formal complaint last month by Schnaubelt about the chess match, in which players buy in for the chance of receiving cash prizes, the gaming department decided to do nothing. Amanda Jacinto of the gaming department told New Times for our June 15 article on Schnaubelt's attempted trouble-making that her agency believes the 116th annual chess event "doesn't rise to a level where it needs an investigation."

Internet cafes and off-reservation poker rooms where people can get their gambling jones obviously do rise to the level where investigations are needed, though. 

We called Jacinto for comment on the Netclix case — we'll let you know what she says if she calls back. We also left a message for Phoenix police.

One important question still unanswered by authorities is who owns this business and the level of suspected involvement by the owner. State records have no official filings on Netclix.

UPDATE: 1pm — Sergeant Jonathan Howard of the PPD got back to us, (though we still haven't heard from the gaming department.) Here's what Howard told us:

"Ray, I do not know who the owners of the business are but I can assure you that our investigation into the enterprise in continuing. The original contact with the business regarding the criminal activity occurred after May 24th. I have not seen an update regarding the arrest of anyone involved in the earlier robbery at this location."

Netclix at 3575 West Dunlap Avenue was raided on Wednesday, its owner arrested in connection with an illegal gambling operation.

The Arizona Department of Gaming and Phoenix police raided a Phoenix Internet cafe on Wednesday, arresting the manager in connection with an illegal gambling operation.

Bradley John Babinski Jr., 28, was arrested after 1 p.m. Wednesday following an investigation of Netclix Internet Cafe at 3575 West Dunlap Avenue where undercover officers observed illegal activity on several visits. Several other people were arrested during the raid on unrelated warrants or drug charges.

Bradley John Babinski Jr.

Wednesday's raid also followed a May 24 robbery of the cafe that is still unsolved. In that case, police told one news outlet that "it was an odd place to hold up." Phoenix Police Sergeant Derek Elmore told Fox 10 News (KSAZ-TV) that the robber possibly "had some inside knowledge about what kind of money they had on hand there . . . or what kind of money they produce on hand . . . or maybe he's a former employee."

Whoever committed the robbery, the crime seems to put the cafe on the state gaming department's radar.

On June 10, gaming inspectors checked out Netclix and served Babinski with a notice that his business was conducting illegal gaming. After that, undercover officers went into Netclix on June 15, 16, and 18 and reportedly observed that the illegal activity was continuing.

Numerous computers and other evidence was seized during Wednesday's raid, effectively shutting down the business for now.

Customers of Netclix would pay the employee on duty to purchase Internet time, records state.

"The Internet time is used to play casino games and sweepstakes," says Babinski's booking sheet. "These games pay out money for winnings. Thus the customer pays money to play unregulated games with the expectation of winning money."

Now, maybe you're thinking, "do they mean an unregulated game for prizes like the upcoming U.S. Open Chess Championship?" We know poker advocate John Schnaubelt must be wondering that. But following a formal complaint last month by Schnaubelt about the chess match, in which players buy in for the chance of receiving cash prizes, the gaming department decided to do nothing. Amanda Jacinto of the gaming department told New Times for our June 15 article on Schnaubelt's attempted trouble-making that her agency believes the 116th annual chess event "doesn't rise to a level where it needs an investigation."

Internet cafes and off-reservation poker rooms where people can get their gambling jones obviously do rise to the level where investigations are needed, though. 

We called Jacinto for comment on the Netclix case — we'll let you know what she says if she calls back. We also left a message for Phoenix police.

One important question still unanswered by authorities is who owns this business and the level of suspected involvement by the owner. State records have no official filings on Netclix.

UPDATE: 1pm — Sergeant Jonathan Howard of the PPD got back to us, (though we still haven't heard from the gaming department.) Here's what Howard told us:

"Ray, I do not know who the owners of the business are but I can assure you that our investigation into the enterprise in continuing. The original contact with the business regarding the criminal activity occurred after May 24th. I have not seen an update regarding the arrest of anyone involved in the earlier robbery at this location."

Police made several arrests and seized computers and other evidence Wednesday afternoon when they executed a search warrant of a Phoenix Internet cafe on suspicion of illegal gambling, according to police documents.

Authorities said Netclix, an Internet cafe near 35th Avenue and Dunlap Avenue, continued to run an illegal gambling business despite receiving a notice from the Arizona Department of Gaming earlier this month stating its practices were illegal and unregulated.

Bradley John Babinski Jr., 28, of Phoenix was arrested during the execution of the search warrant on suspicion of illegal control of an enterprise through racketeering and three other related illegal gambling charges, according to court records.

Babinski was a manager of Netclix and was on duty when the Arizona Department of Gaming inspected the business and served him a notice on June 10, according to police.

An undercover officer then went back to the business on three separate days after the notice, to find that Netclix was still allowing patrons to illegally gamble on its computers, including when Babinski was on duty, police said.

The undercover officer would pay the employee on duty and have his identification recorded in exchange for a personal-identification number, which would allow him to play casino games and sweepstakes on the computers, according to court documents. Police said these games were played with the expectation that the games would pay out money for winnings.

Police also arrested several customers within Netclix when the warrant was executed, for unrelated warrants or drug violations, police said.

Babinski admitted to inputting patrons' identification information and supervising the business, but said he felt it was the owner's responsibility to make changes in response to the Arizona Department of Gaming notice. He said he was paid in cash for his employment, according to court records.

Babinski was released without bond payment. His first court appearance was scheduled for July 9, according to court records.

Article source: http://www.azcentral.com/story/news/local/phoenix/2015/06/25/phoenix-internet-cafe-running-illegal-gambling-business/29273867/

In separate cases over the weekend, police and military police arrested dozens of people caught smoking crystal methamphetamine at a video arcade in Phnom Penh and an Internet cafe in Siem Reap City, according to officials, who said the venues had been converted into drug dens by dealers hoping to “confuse” authorities.

In Phnom Penh on Saturday, police raided a three-story video arcade in Daun Penh district’s Srah Chak commune, where they found 33 young men and women smoking the synthetic drug in 10 rooms on the ground floor and 10 rooms on the top floor, said municipal anti-drug police chief Born Sam Ath.

Brigadier General Sam Ath, who led the noontime operation, said his officers only managed to confiscate a small amount of the drug, as many of the drug users—including a number of suspected dealers—were able to ditch their stashes while police searched the building’s many rooms.

On the second floor, he said, 20 men were found playing arcade games in apparent ignorance of the drug use above and below them, and were also arrested.

“Now, the 20 men are taking urine tests,” he said. “If they are not involved with the drugs, we will call their parents to take them home. But if we find drugs in their urine, we will send them to court with the other 33 drug users and drug distributors.”

Brig. Gen. Sam Ath said all 53 people were being held at the Phnom Penh police headquarters, and would be sent to the municipal court today. He said the court also ordered police to remove all 19 arcade machines from the building and send them to the courthouse as evidence.

In a separate case, military police raided an Internet cafe in Siem Reap City’s Kokchak commune on Saturday night and found 13 teenagers and young men smoking crystal meth in a back room, according to Srey Youra, deputy commander of the provincial military police.

“We arrested 13 young men between the ages of 14 and 25 and confiscated 10 small plastic bags containing [a total of] 1.6 grams of ‘ice,’” Mr. Youra said, using a slang term for the narcotic. He said the 13 would be sent to the Siem Reap Provincial Court today.

While not coordinated, the arrests over the weekend revealed efforts by both drug distributors and small-scale dealers to hide their activities in unassuming establishments in the face of more frequent police raids, said Meas Vyrith, secretary-general of the National Authority for Combating Drugs, an assessment echoed by Mr. Youra and Mr. Sam Ath.

Lieutenant General Vyrith said that while guesthouses were previously favored, “drug distributors have changed their tactics.”

“They are using public places to meet with drug dealers—Internet shops and gaming arcades —to confuse our anti-drug police,” he said, adding that authorities would respond accordingly.

rith@cambodiadaily.com

© 2015, The Cambodia Daily. All rights reserved. No part of this article may be reproduced in print, electronically, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without written permission.

Internet-bar-throatcutting-1.jpg

A 17-year-old teenager was killed at an internet cafe in Dongguan, Guangdong province when one of his peers snuck up from behind him and slashed his throat with a knife.

The victim, Guo Xianghu, had reportedly gotten into a dispute with the suspect, surnamed Lei, in a KTV bar just below the web cafe.

Lei ran to a department store to purchase two knives before entering the internet cafe, where Guo had been using a computer. Surveillance footage shows as the suspect, dressed in a white shirt and black pants, walked up to an unsuspecting Guo with a knife behind his back.

Lei grabbed the victim with his left hand and quickly cut his throat with his right hand. He then pushed the teen aside and fled. Guo's friends got up and chased behind Lei as the victim was seen stumbling from his chair with his hand to his throat, blood spilling on his shirt.

slit-throat3.jpg

"The victim's friends didn't succeed in chasing the suspect, but the police came quickly," staff from a neighborhood store told reporters. "The boy lost too much blood and [rescuers] couldn't help."

by Maggie Wong

CLEARWATER, Fla. - Just days after a new law went into effect regulating internet cafes, a new one opened in Pinellas County.

About 1,800 internet cafes were shut down in 2013, after the legislature passed a law making them illegal if they involved gambling or cash payouts.

A new law allows similar businesses to operate, if they comply with certain rules.

But it's still unclear if the latest business meets those requirements.

It was the kind of grand opening most businesses would dream of -- customer after customer filing into a nondescript Pinellas County storefront concealed by vertical blinds.

The word "Paris" on the door gives little clue what is going on inside.

When the I-team paid a visit, we weren't inside long enough to see exactly what kind of business it was before we were shown the door.

“Please go,” a male employee said, when we walked inside.

He declined to elaborate on what was going on inside the business.

We saw the same man in May at an internet café on Memorial Highway in Hillsborough County.

That business was one of more than a half-dozen internet cafes shut down by the county after undercover deputies discovered illegal gambling going on inside.

Internet cafes were outlawed by the state in 2013, following the arrest of 57 people who allegedly operated illegal gambling businesses under the guise of a veteran's charity.

Since then, how that law is enforced varies.

“The state left it up to the city and county to enforce the laws. And the cities and counties felt that it was the state's obligation,” said Brewer Miller, who operates a senior arcade in Clearwater.

That type of business is allowed under a law that went into effect July 1.

To keep everything legal, games must involve skill, and prizes can't be paid in cash. 

The landlord for the new Pinellas County internet cafe says he was assured by  his new tenants that they are obeying the new rules.

We have no way of knowing that anything illegal is going on inside. 

We spoke to the Pinellas County Sheriff's Office and they're looking into it, but Pinellas county doesn't have specific guidelines regulating these businesses, so it’s not clear what action they'll take.

If you have something you would like the I-Team to investigate, contact us at adam@abcactionnews.com

Netclix at 3575 West Dunlap Avenue was raided on Wednesday, its owner arrested in connection with an illegal gambling operation.

The Arizona Department of Gaming and Phoenix police raided a Phoenix Internet cafe on Wednesday, arresting the manager in connection with an illegal gambling operation.

Bradley John Babinski Jr., 28, was arrested after 1 p.m. Wednesday following an investigation of Netclix Internet Cafe at 3575 West Dunlap Avenue where undercover officers observed illegal activity on several visits. Several other people were arrested during the raid on unrelated warrants or drug charges.

Bradley John Babinski Jr.

Wednesday's raid also followed a May 24 robbery of the cafe that is still unsolved. In that case, police told one news outlet that "it was an odd place to hold up." Phoenix Police Sergeant Derek Elmore told Fox 10 News (KSAZ-TV) that the robber possibly "had some inside knowledge about what kind of money they had on hand there . . . or what kind of money they produce on hand . . . or maybe he's a former employee."

Whoever committed the robbery, the crime seems to put the cafe on the state gaming department's radar.

On June 10, gaming inspectors checked out Netclix and served Babinski with a notice that his business was conducting illegal gaming. After that, undercover officers went into Netclix on June 15, 16, and 18 and reportedly observed that the illegal activity was continuing.

Numerous computers and other evidence was seized during Wednesday's raid, effectively shutting down the business for now.

Customers of Netclix would pay the employee on duty to purchase Internet time, records state.

"The Internet time is used to play casino games and sweepstakes," says Babinski's booking sheet. "These games pay out money for winnings. Thus the customer pays money to play unregulated games with the expectation of winning money."

Now, maybe you're thinking, "do they mean an unregulated game for prizes like the upcoming U.S. Open Chess Championship?" We know poker advocate John Schnaubelt must be wondering that. But following a formal complaint last month by Schnaubelt about the chess match, in which players buy in for the chance of receiving cash prizes, the gaming department decided to do nothing. Amanda Jacinto of the gaming department told New Times for our June 15 article on Schnaubelt's attempted trouble-making that her agency believes the 116th annual chess event "doesn't rise to a level where it needs an investigation."

Internet cafes and off-reservation poker rooms where people can get their gambling jones obviously do rise to the level where investigations are needed, though. 

We called Jacinto for comment on the Netclix case — we'll let you know what she says if she calls back. We also left a message for Phoenix police.

One important question still unanswered by authorities is who owns this business and the level of suspected involvement by the owner. State records have no official filings on Netclix.

UPDATE: 1pm — Sergeant Jonathan Howard of the PPD got back to us, (though we still haven't heard from the gaming department.) Here's what Howard told us:

"Ray, I do not know who the owners of the business are but I can assure you that our investigation into the enterprise in continuing. The original contact with the business regarding the criminal activity occurred after May 24th. I have not seen an update regarding the arrest of anyone involved in the earlier robbery at this location."