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Internet Cafe

china computerAlexander F. Yuan/APA man uses a computer at an internet cafe in central Beijing, China, Friday, Dec. 28, 2012

Chinese officials called on Wednesday for controls on the Internet to preserve stability, saying its model for cyberspace regulation can be the framework for spawning commercial successes like Alibaba Group Holding Ltd.

The comments, made at the start of the World Internet Conference (WIC), show China is unlikely to loosen its tight grip on the medium even as it has begun a transformation of its economic model.

"This place is crowded with tourists, who are perfectly orderly, and cyberspace should also be free and open, with rules to follow and always following the rule of law," Lu Wei, China's Internet chief and director of the State Internet Information Office, said at the conference.

Lu was referring to China's eastern tourist town of Wuzhen, roughly 75 miles from Shanghai, which is hosting the three-day conference.

Among those attending the conference were executives from Apple Inc, Facebook Inc, LinkedIn Corp, IBM Corp , Microsoft Corp, Qualcomm Inc, SoftBank Corp, Cisco Systems Inc, Amazon.com Inc, Nokia, Intel Corp and Thomson Reuters Corp.

They already got a taste of China's intent when on Tuesday the Chinese government blocked access to a swathe of websites in what an Internet monitoring group said was a blunt censorship campaign.

With a population of 1.4 billion and 632 million people online, China is a market no one wants to miss out on. But

it also has the world's most sophisticated online censorship system, known outside the country as the Great Firewall.

It blocks many social media services, such as Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Instagram, Snapchat and Google, along with many rights groups sites and some foreign media agencies.

China's own Internet firms have seen huge success on their home turf. Alibaba, which made a record-breaking $25 billion listing in New York earlier this year, Tencent Holdings Ltd and Baidu Inc are together worth more than $500 billion in market capitalization. All three of China's biggest Internet companies were in attendance at the conference.

"The Internet is a double-edged sword," said State Council Vice Premier Ma Kai at the conference.

"Well used, it's Alibaba's treasure. Poorly used, it's Pandora's box. Cyber security is a shared challenge faced by human society. Effectively dealing with it is a shared responsibility for all governments," said Ma.

(Additional reporting by Beijing Newsroom; Editing by Muralikumar Anantharaman)

This article originally appeared at Reuters. Copyright 2014. Follow Reuters on Twitter.

Article source: http://www.businessinsider.com/r-china-says-controls-on-internet-needed-to-maintain-stability-2014-11

At Occidental Video and Internet Cafe, anachronistic evidence of the great digital divide is everywhere.

It’s in the cafe’s dusty computers rented out to locals for $4 an hour ($2 for students) to access broadband Internet service. And it’s in the musty shelves of DVD movies and blockbuster cable shows city-dwellers can watch at home or stream on HBO Go or Netflix.

Maleika Dance, an area resident who works at the cafe and video store, said many customers use the Internet cafe because they do not have access to broadband services at home.

Danny Candib, the owner of the cafe, said some people come in to maintain their website, check their Facebook page or conduct online banking. The Internet, Candib said, is as important today as electricity was generations ago.

“There are some people who are forced to come in and use it,” Candib said.

That’s a familiar story for many rural residents on the North Coast, where the farther you get from Highway 101, the fewer options you have for actively participating in the 21st century.

A recent survey by the U.S. Census Bureau tells that story.

According to the census survey, which was released last week, the Santa Rosa metropolitan area has among the highest rates of broadband use in California and the rest of the country.

But the bad news in Sonoma County is if you don’t live near Highway 101, you might as well live in Mississippi or other Deep South communities where high-speed Internet access is a luxury.

The survey did not include metro areas with populations smaller than 65,000 people, so it does not contain statistics for places like Occidental, Freestone or Cazadero.

In Ukiah, 82 percent of households have a computer, but just under 65 percent of residents in the Mendocino County seat have high-speed broadband Internet service, according to the survey.

That statistic is comparable to the Jackson metro area in Mississippi, where 64.2 percent of households have broadband. In fact, the nation’s lowest state averages for broadband use are in Mississippi, at 62.3 percent, and Arkansas, with 65.7 percent.

California has a state average of 77.4 percent, while the national average is 72.9 percent.

“This is yet another study reinforcing the ‘digital divide,’ ” said Brian Churm, technical chair of the Broadband Alliance of Mendocino County.

Churm said that rural communities in the North Coast are all too familiar with this divide, where “fast Internet is available to those who live in cities and can afford it.”

In the Santa Rosa metro area, which includes Petaluma, 81.3 percent of households have broadband Internet service. That’s comparable to other high-penetration broadband metro areas in the state, such as San Francisco (82.5 percent), Napa (82.8 percent) and Santa Cruz-Watsonville (82.4 percent).

As expected, at 86 percent the metro area defined by San Jose, Santa Clara and Sunnyvale has the highest average household broadband penetration.

For years, the Broadband Alliance has been working with other North Coast groups to improve and make available high-speed Internet services in rural and coastal communities.

Earlier this year, an ambitious 16-county, $138 million project for expanding broadband service to about 150,000 rural California households failed to get necessary funding from the state Public Utilities Commission.

The Golden Bear Broadband proposal, nearly three years in the making, would have benefited 3,520 households in Sonoma and Mendocino counties. That project has been replaced by a smaller effort that has brought together broadband advocates from Sonoma, Marin, Napa and Mendocino counties.

Over the summer, Sonoma County supervisors signed off on the partnership, whose first step was to map out each county’s priority areas that lack reliable Internet service.

Sonoma County’s priority areas include Cazadero, Jenner, Sea Ranch, Dry Creek Valley and the Joy Road community just west of Occidental. In Marin County, priority areas include Muir Beach, Point Reyes Station, Stinson Beach and Nicasio.

The new project, known as the North Bay North Coast Broadband Consortium, is documenting who has broadband and who doesn’t in an effort to encourage providers to build out broadband infrastructure in these areas.

“The Internet is used for so many things, even applying to jobs or social or government services,” said Barbara Thornton, who sits on the Marin Broadband Task Force, which is part of the consortium.

Michael Nicholls, co-chairman of Access Sonoma Broadband, the county’s representative in the consortium, said the government needs to recognize that broadband Internet service is as important today as the telephone was for most of the 20th century.

Title II oversight mandating that telephone service be provided to rural areas was part of the 1934 Communications Act passed by Congress. The same act formed the Federal Communications Commission. Internet service has been deregulated since the Telecommunications Act of 1996 and doesn’t fall under Title II oversight.

High-speed Internet advocates such as Nicholls have been arguing that broadband service be included in Title II regulation. That would give the California Public Utilities Commission the ability to mandate that broadband be extended to rural areas, Nicholls said. President Barack Obama recently announced that he supported reclassifying Internet service under Title II.

“These are not isolated communities,” Nicholls said. “These communities have been there for 150 years, but the technology just passed them by.”

You can reach Staff Writer Martin Espinoza at 521-5213 or martin.espinoza@pressdemocrat.com. On Twitter @renofish.

Gewalt ist keine Lösung. Schon gar nicht wegen einem Spiel. Und wegen Call of Duty schon mal überhaupt nicht. Doch da hatten zwei Thailänder wohl eine gänzlich andere Meinung zu.

Screenshot zu: Thailänder prügeln sich im Internet-Cafe wegen Call of Duty'Call of Duty'-Trolle seht euch vor, manche kommen tatsächlich vorbeiDie Situation dürften die meisten kennen, die gerne mal online spielen, egal ob nun Shooter, Strategie, Sportspiel, Rennspiel oder MMOs. Irgendjemand ist entweder am Trollen oder cheatet. In Shootern wird das Campen, also das Verharren an einem günstigen Punkt, um Gegnern aufzulauern, gerne als eine Art "Cheat", zumindest aber als unhöfliche Geste gesehen. "Camper" hat dabei denselben Stellenwert wie "Cheater".

Bricht dabei unter Umständen auch noch eine Diskussion aus, die in Beleidigungen ausartet, lehnt sich der ein oder andere Troll auch schon gerne mal weit aus dem Fenster, und teilt seinem Kontrahenten mit, wo er ihn finden könne, und dass er sich nicht vor einer Auseinandersetzung fürchtet. In 99 Prozent der Fälle bleibt es dabei. Nach der Runde geht jeder seines Weges. Nicht so in diesem Fall in Thailand. Dort verlangten Mitspieler, dass ein Spieler mit dem Campen aufhören soll, woraufhin er entgegnete, "Ich chille im Quan Lon Cafe, wenn jemand ein Problem hat."

Und jemand hatte damit ein Problem, wie das Video der Überwachungskamera beweist. Glücklicherweise konnten die Streithähne schließlich voneinander getrennt werden. Bis auf Blessuren und einer beleidigten Ehre wird hier wohl nicht viel passiert sein.

Sagt jemandem, den ihr gerade online getrollt und beleidigt habt, also niemals, wo er euch finden kann. Die Person könnte tatsächlich mal zu einem "Pläuschen" vorbeikommen.

Ein weiteres Video

Article source: http://www.gamona.de/games/aktuelles,thailaender-pruegeln-sich-im-internet-cafe-wegen-call-of:news,2561830.html

click to enlarge
  • CAFE CULTURE For mobile writerly types, a good cafe's WiFi has to be as strong as its espresso.

Cafes have always been the unofficial workplaces for creatives and freelance writers working on the next big thing. As the laptop replaced the notebook, the internet cafe was born, complete with free WiFi, good music, plenty of sockets and 'hang out as long as you like' policy. But finding a cafe in the North Bay that offers all of the above, while keeping coffee standards high can be a challenge, especially outside of large cities. Here are a few dignified options, whether you live on a slope in Marin, or by the river in Sonoma County..

In Sebastopol, Taylor Maid Farms is as close as it gets to a perfect second office. Opened in the beginning of 2014 at the Barlow, the place is a mecca for photographers, writers and scholars who seek a bright, friendly space to accommodate their business and creative exploration. Laptop users can choose between bar stools on the terrace, a spot on the upper level, or roomy tables by the counter, where some visitors have regular seats; many spend the whole day here.

The smell of freshly ground coffee, roasted on location, is ever-present, but the play list changes according to the staff's mood. You might type to French chansons one day then browse to alternative rock the next. Culinary minimalism—just pastries and cookies—ensures no one will distract you with a tuna sandwich while you're editing your short film, and the most indulgent item on the beverage menu is lavender or pumpkin latte.

The same no-nonsense attitude can be observed in other Sonoma County hotspots—smaller than Tailor Maid but very effective nevertheless. Roasting their own beans and sharing a modern design of wood and steel, both Acre Coffee in Petaluma and Santa Rosa and Flying Goat Coffee in Healdsburg and Santa Rosa host dozens of laptop users on daily basis. While Acre offers a busy, urban vibe and networking, Flying Goat's atmosphere is laid-back and small-town friendly, welcoming yoga-practicing girls, rural entrepreneurs and nonprofit enthusiasts.

In addition to the Acre and Flying Goat, Santa Rosa has plenty of laptop-friendly options, but none of them has the sunlight or menu of Criminal Baking Co. Undercover Noshery. This tiny SOFA district place is charming and arty, with Melody coffee and WiFi fast enough to Skype, if you must. The menu will make sure nobody goes home hungry.

Napa County's choice of coffee shops could be improved, but glimpses of hope emerge occasionally. Yo El Rey Roasting in Calistoga may have limited seating, but the cute modern design and the excellent fair trade, organic coffee make this coffee shop a pleasant pit stop. The Calistoga Roastery is a cozy alternative, where families outnumber laptop tappers.

Marin County offers plenty of nearly-perfect spots, catering to students, tech workers and young dads on maternity leave. Fans of quirky, unusual settings and anyone who'd like to try a "scuffin," should head to Dr. Insomniac's in Novato. Christmas lights and homemade lattes make for a good workday boost, and the muffin-meets-scone pastries are addictive.

In San Rafael, Royal Ground Coffee and Aroma Cafe both have plenty of sunlight and a number of tables to perch your laptop on. Royal Ground has generous food portions and luscious mocha drinks, presented in a relaxed, casual environment. Aroma Cafe serves Grafeo espresso and McLaughlin Coffee Co. brew, plus a tempting Mediterranean menu. The exposed brick and the artwork, featuring local artists, make for a European vibe, perfect for an afternoon escapism session.

Alternatively, a very happening local atmosphere can be found at Mill Valley's Depot Cafe and Bookstore, located in one of the most charming buildings in the county. An old train depot, the narrow structure's big windows fill the space with light. As delicious salads and quiches come out of the kitchen, coffee drinks can be overlooked, but great lattes and ice coffees, courtesy of Peerless Coffee in Oakland, are available.

A similar deal—books, sun, music and coffee—makes Corte Madera's Book Passage a favorite destination. Here, the scene is more Golden Girls than HBO's Girls, and the menu offers delicious gluten-free options. In chic San Anselmo, where everyone seems to be on a perpetual vacation, the San Anselmo Coffee Roastery is a popular daytime spot. Located on a street corner, it pampers laptop crowds with ample seating, a very Instagrammable mural for a background and house-roasted beans.

Balancing good coffee, quietude and creative energy isn't easily achieved, but these coffee shops hit the mark.

Residents welcome internet café in Treadways, St Catherine

Sunday, October 12, 2014 | 2:38 PM    

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ST CATHERINE, Jamaica (JIS) — Joyous shouts and cheers filled the atmosphere in Treadways recently as residents showed their appreciation for the opening of an internet café here.

Not even the onset of afternoon showers could put a damper on the celebratory mood of the residents, scores of whom turned out to witness the official opening of the approximately $300,000 facility.

The café, which is intended to benefit residents of Treadways and neighbouring communities, is located on the grounds of the Treadways Gospel Assembly.

The initiative is one of four projects undertaken by Civil Servant of the Year 2013-14 and director of productions at the Jamaica Information Service (JIS) Enthrose Campbell under the theme ‘Transformation and Renewal for a Better Tomorrow’.

The Treadways internet café project is supported by Digicel, which donated computers, desks and chairs. The facility is equipped with two desktop computers, two laptop computers, a multipurpose printer, and wall posters. It will also serve as a homework centre.

Community member Judith Higgins said the facility’s establishment will not only encourage more young people to attend church, but will also allow them to conduct research.

In his remarks, Science, Technology, Energy, and Mining Minister Phillip Paulwell said the initiative supports the Government’s thrust to increase access to broadband services.

He said the establishment of internet cafés, supported by citizens and members of the private sector, along with the Community Access Points (CAPs) that the Government is putting place, will further advance this mission.

“What we want to see is what Enthrose is doing here today. How we are going to get our people to have access to the technology that will enable us to develop ourselves, that will enable us to be a part of this global village, that sees information [not only] as a valuable tool for learning but also as a tool for earning,” he said.

CAPs enable community members to use the internet at minimal or no cost for research, bill payments, education, communication, business, marketing, and social networking.

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MONTREAL — The dramatic search for Luka Rocco Magnotta ended at a Berlin Internet cafe in June 2012 with an abrupt admission from the accused that he was the person authorities were looking for.

Adam Berry / AFP / Getty Images

Confronted by a German police officer in the cafe, Magnotta initially identified himself as Kirk Trammell, an American from New York who didn’t have any identification on him, his murder trial heard Tuesday.

But a persistent German patrol officer, Marc Lilge, continued to question the man, who was stuttering, shaking and sweating, as several police cadets looked on.

Finally, came an admission, Lilge testified.

“You got me, I’m Mr. Magnotta, I’m the man you’re looking for,”’ Lilge quoted Magnotta as saying.

Magnotta is charged with first-degree murder in the slaying and dismemberment of Jun Lin in May 2012 in Montreal before fleeing to Paris and then heading to Berlin.

He has admitted to killing the Chinese engineering student, but has pleaded not guilty by way of mental disorder.

Lilge said he handcuffed Magnotta immediately and that the Canadian’s last words were that he wanted to leave the scene before the media arrived.

Lilge said Magnotta had a grin on his face as he was transported to a detention centre.

“I have the opinion that, somehow, he felt relieved because he had this grin on his face,” he said.

Adam Berry / AFP / Getty Images

Magnotta faces four charges in addition to premeditated murder: criminally harassing Prime Minister Stephen Harper and other members of Parliament; mailing obscene and indecent material; committing an indignity to a body; and publishing obscene materials.

Lilge is among the final crop of Crown witnesses being heard by the jury through testimony videotaped last June and July in France and Germany.

The Internet cafe employee who flagged down Lilge said he saw Magnotta looking at news stories about himself on June 4, 2012, and recognized him right away because of his distinctive cheek bones after seeing his photograph in a German newspaper.

Kadir Anlayisli said he walked by him a few times to be sure and noted he was looking at online stories.

Adam Berry / AFP / Getty Images

“There was a picture of this man and all of a sudden this very man was standing in front of me,” Anlayisli said. “I had read that the cellphone had been tracked in France and here he was in front of me.

“Yes, I did recognize him right away because of his cheek bones. He has weird cheek bones.”

Anlayisli attracted Lilge’s attention and Magnotta was arrested before he could pay for the Internet use.

Another German detective, Alexander Huebner, testified he tried to speak to Magnotta a few hours after his arrest but that he wouldn’t talk. The witness said Magnotta appeared very calm.

Associated Press

“I remember Mr. Magnotta being without emotion,” said Huebner.

Under cross-examination from defence attorney Luc Leclair, Huebner said he couldn’t remember if he told Magnotta he could contact a lawyer.

Lilge said he did tell Magnotta about having the right to an attorney but did not tell him about getting consular assistance.

As of Tuesday, the Crown had presented 46 witnesses since the trial opened in late September.

Defence lawyer Luc Leclair is expected to begin presenting his case Friday.

Article source: http://news.nationalpost.com/2014/10/28/cornered-in-a-berlin-internet-cafe-luka-magnotta-tried-to-convince-police-he-was-kirk-trammel-from-new-york-trial-hears/

In some cities, it seems like they have internet cafes on every corner, but there wasn't much in downtown Savannah. Until recently. Lenny Bere describes his business, Savannah Printing 24/7, as a kind of bazaar. It's bigger on the inside than it looks from outside, and offers computer and printing services, food and beverages, even a clothing store.

"We do graphic design, cards for a lot of the restaurant/bars in the area," Bere said. "Malone's, Mercury Lounge, O'Connell's, things like that. Internet access 24 hours. We also work on PCs and Macs. Wireless internet for outside. Serve food. We do a bunch of different things here."

Bere says his all-day, all-night print shop features self-service with assistance, and prides itself on the latest technology.

"On [our] website, there's an upload section," he explained. "You upload your file and it comes to our system here, we print it out, and in about an hour, you have your prints."

Downstairs, it's a more casual mood at the Hideaway Lounge, with comfortable seating and games both high and low tech. Manager Joanna Shane says the atmosphere can be conducive to studying or partying, depending on the crowd.

"You can go on the internet and play chess, and the other room is internet accessible, so you can play people around the world, which is a lot of fun," she says.

Whether you have serious business to conduct or are just looking to wind down after a night on the town, this 24-hour downtown destination aims to have something for everyone.

"Even children that come to print something out for Mother's Day," noted Bere.

They tell us they'll also be offering live entertainment and even backgammon tournaments, so it does look like they're after a little of everything.

Reported by: Charles Gray, cgray@wtoc.com

 

Article source: http://www.wtoc.com/story/1288889/24-hour-internet-cafe

The dramatic search for Luka Rocco Magnotta ended at a Berlin Internet cafe in June 2012 with an abrupt admission from the accused that he was the person authorities were looking for.

Confronted by a German police officer in the cafe, Magnotta initially identified himself as Kirk Trammell, an American from New York who didn’t have any identification on him, his murder trial heard Tuesday.

But a persistent German patrol officer, Marc Lilge, continued to question the man, who was stuttering, shaking and sweating, as several police cadets shadowing Lilge looked on.

The admission came after a few minutes.

‘”You got me, I’m Mr. Magnotta, I’m the man you’re looking for,”’ Lilge quoted Magnotta as saying.

Magnotta, 32, is charged with first-degree murder in the slaying and dismemberment of Jun Lin in May 2012 in Montreal before he fled to Paris and then Berlin.

He has admitted to killing the Chinese engineering student, but has pleaded not guilty by way of mental disorder.

Crown prosecutor Louis Bouthillier presented his final scheduled witness on Tuesday afternoon. Following the testimony, Quebec Superior Court Justice Guy Cournoyer addressed the jury.

“With this, the evidence of the prosecution is almost completed,” Cournoyer said. “Counsel are working on the last series of written admissions and this requires some verification. We don’t want that verification to be carried through in unnecessary haste.”

Cournoyer suspended the proceedings until Friday, when defence lawyer Luc Leclair is expected to begin presenting his case.

The judge told the jurors it’s normal to have a few days separation between Crown and defence evidence in a trial of this length.

On Tuesday, several German witnesses provided a snapshot of June 4, 2012, the day Magnotta was arrested.

Lilge said he handcuffed Magnotta immediately and that the Canadian’s last words were that he wanted to leave the scene before the media arrived.

The police officer testified that the accused had a smirk on his face as he was transported to a detention centre.

“I have the opinion that, somehow, he felt relieved because he had this grin on his face,” he said, adding Magnotta did everything they asked.

Magnotta faces four charges in addition to premeditated murder: criminally harassing Prime Minister Stephen Harper and other members of Parliament; mailing obscene and indecent material; committing an indignity to a body; and publishing obscene materials.

Lilge was among the final crop of Crown witnesses heard by the jury via testimony videotaped last June and July in France and Germany.

The Internet cafe employee who flagged down Lilge said he saw Magnotta looking at news stories about himself and recognized him right away because of his distinctive cheekbones after seeing his photograph in a German newspaper.

Kadir Anlayisli said he walked by him a few times to be sure and noted he was looking at stories online.

“There was a picture of this man and all of a sudden this very man was standing in front of me,” Anlayisli said. “I had read that the cellphone had been tracked in France and here he was in front of me.

“Yes, I did recognize him right away because of his cheekbones. He has weird cheekbones.”

Anlayisli sought out Lilge outside the cafe and Magnotta was arrested before he could pay for the Internet use.

Another German detective, Alexander Huebner, testified he tried to speak to Magnotta a few hours after his arrest but that he wouldn’t talk. The witness said Magnotta appeared very calm.

“I remember Mr. Magnotta being without emotion,” said Huebner.

Another police witness who was on site for the arrest described Magnotta’s look as “arrogant.”

“It was as if there was nothing (anybody) could do to him,” Thomas Leymann said under cross-examination.

Huebner testified he couldn’t remember if he told Magnotta he could contact a lawyer.

Lilge said he informed Magnotta about having the right to an attorney but did not tell him about getting consular assistance.

As of Tuesday, the Crown had presented 48 witnesses during the trial, which began in late September.

Father Goes Berserk In Net Cafe

A father in Xinyu, Jiangxi province has been arrested and detained by Chinese police after going on a rampage in an Internet cafe, Tencent news reports.

The detained, Mr. Lin, was celebrating his wife's birthday when he noticed his eldest son was missing. Apparently, Lin knew that his son had a penchant for Internet gaming and decided to search the local Internet cafes. Turns out Lin's hunch was right, and his son was indeed inside an Internet cafe.

It was there that Lin broke down. According to Tencent, Lin picked up at a stool and started smashing computers. Supposedly he blamed the Internet cafe for his son's poor grades.

As he was bashing the computers, the net cafe's owner showed up. The two began to argue and after a few traded words, Lin started wailing on the boss man.

When it looked like things couldn't get worse for Lin, the police showed up. Both the owner and Lin were taken down to the local public security bureau. Despite the intervention by the police, Lin's temper didn't seem to subside.

Tencent reports that Lin refused to cooperate with the police, and that at one point, he attacked an officer and spit at another one. Due to his outbursts, he's now getting charged as a violent criminal.

儿子沉迷上网荒废学业 父亲怒砸网吧被刑拘[QQ News]

Kotaku East is your slice of Asian Internet culture, bringing you the latest talking points from Japan, Korea, China and beyond. Tune in every morning from 4am to 8am.

Eric is a Beijing based writer and all around FAT man. You can contact him @FatAsianTechie@gmail.com or follow him on Twitter @FatAsianTechie

Article source: http://kotaku.com/father-goes-berserk-in-net-cafe-1651172722

Father Goes Berserk In Net Cafe

A father in Xinyu, Jiangxi province has been arrested and detained by Chinese police after going on a rampage in an Internet cafe, Tencent news reports.

The detained, Mr. Lin, was celebrating his wife's birthday when he noticed his eldest son was missing. Apparently, Lin knew that his son had a penchant for Internet gaming and decided to search the local Internet cafes. Turns out Lin's hunch was right, and his son was indeed inside an Internet cafe.

It was there that Lin broke down. According to Tencent, Lin picked up at a stool and started smashing computers. Supposedly he blamed the Internet cafe for his son's poor grades.

As he was bashing the computers, the net cafe's owner showed up. The two began to argue and after a few traded words, Lin started wailing on the boss man.

When it looked like things couldn't get worse for Lin, the police showed up. Both the owner and Lin were taken down to the local public security bureau. Despite the intervention by the police, Lin's temper didn't seem to subside.

Tencent reports that Lin refused to cooperate with the police, and that at one point, he attacked an officer and spit at another one. Due to his outbursts, he's now getting charged as a violent criminal.

儿子沉迷上网荒废学业 父亲怒砸网吧被刑拘[QQ News]

Kotaku East is your slice of Asian Internet culture, bringing you the latest talking points from Japan, Korea, China and beyond. Tune in every morning from 4am to 8am.

Eric is a Beijing based writer and all around FAT man. You can contact him @FatAsianTechie@gmail.com or follow him on Twitter @FatAsianTechie