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The Palms II filed a civil suit in December to prevent law enforcement from stepping in. Judge says games do fit definition of slot machines.

Games at a local internet cafe violate state laws against slot machines, a judge ruled this week. Should The Palms II re-open on State Route 200, the judge’s findings pave the way for law enforcement to step in.

The case in front of Circuit Judge Edward Scott fell in civil court rather than criminal court. It dates back to December 2015, when the State Attorney’s Office warned Palms owners in a letter that their games violated state laws. The letter continued to warn that owners risked arrest and forfeiture of their machines should the cafe continue to operate.

Cafe owners took the case to court. Arguing that their games were based on skill rather than luck, and therefore should not be considered slot machines, they sought an injunction against State Attorney Brad King and then-Sheriff Chris Blair (later adjusted to current Sheriff Emery Gainey). The injunction would have prevented law enforcement from interfering in their operations. Cafe owners simultaneously sought a declaratory judgement action that would have validated their games as legal under state law.

In an order granting summary judgement, Scott this week instead ruled in favor of King and Gainey.

The Palms II has been closed since December, according to Justin Kaplan, a Miami-based attorney who represented plaintiffs in the case. He said his client is considering whether to appeal this week’s decision.

Playing a key role in court proceedings was the nature of the games at The Palms II.

Had Scott found them to be skill-based, as Kaplan argued he should, they would have fallen under the Family Amusement Games Act. This more recent legislation allows for some exceptions to the state’s wide-reaching prohibitions against gambling, which were broadened in 2013 to the point they threatened establishments like Chuck E. Cheese’s and Dave and Buster’s.

Scott instead found Palms machines to be games of chance, according to his order. That, under Florida law as interpreted by Scott, put them in violation of a another law regulating slot machines.

Court documents that describe how games at the cafe work suggest that games incorporate both skill and chance. Patrons would pay to use a machine, according to the court records. The first screen would show cascading tiles or a “loot wheel” that determined the amount of points they could potentially win. A second screen tasked them with “shooting” ducks, marked with percentage amounts, that moved across the screen. A patron who “shoots” a 25 percent duck would get 25 percent of the potential points indicated on the first screen.

The injunction petition likens the second screen to Nintendo’s “Duck Hunt” game from the late 1908s.

Patrons could redeem points on-site for low-cost merchandise, similar to an arcade, according to the injunction. A cash equivalent was not offered for points.

Noting in his order that facts of the case were not disputed, just how to interpret the laws surrounding them, Scott granted a motion for summary judgement. This meant that he, rather than a jury, ultimately decided on the case.

Kaplan, who noted competing evidence as to whether chance played a material role in the outcome of the game, said he feels the case should have gone to a jury.

The Palms II is not the first local internet cafe to come under the scrutiny of law enforcement. The Florida Department of Law Enforcement cracked down on cafes in 2014, closing at least two in Marion County. Authorities arrested another cafe manager last year.

Mark Simpson, an assistant state attorney who represented King in the case and who has prosecuted criminal cases against other internet cafes, said he is not aware of any internet cafes currently in operation in Marion County.

He said his office prosecutes internet cafes rigorously.

“If places open up,” he said, “we’ll find out about them.”

The Palms II closed after Gov. Rick Scott strengthened legislation on slot machines in 2013, according to Star-Banner reports, but re-opened quietly after a hiatus of several months. The Florida Division of Corporations indicates the establishment opened in 2011.

Contact Nicki Gorny at 352-867-4065, nicki.gorny@ocala.com or @Nicki_Gorny.

SPRING HILL — Senior citizens flock to Spinners Sweepstakes Cafe in a strip mall off U.S. 19.

Related News/Archive

  • Everybody's Business for Sept. 12: Mimi's Cafe closes

    More than a Year ago

  • Labor Day business and government closings in Hernando

    More than a Year ago

  • New privacy rules for Internet service would be illegal, providers say

    2 Months Ago

They drink coffee and eat Fig Newtons. Sometimes the only sound is the clicking of mouses as guests play the slot machine-style computer games.

They come even though it's fake money, and even though there's nothing to win.

"It's a place to gather in the afternoon for seniors," said Betty Burns, 86, of Spring Hill, mouse in hand. "It's social."

At least a half-dozen other Internet cafes in Hernando County offer computer slot games. But at least two of them have offered payouts to customers, according to the Hernando County Sheriff's Office, which closed them this month after conducting an undercover operation.

Spinners has not paid players since the practice was outlawed in Florida three years ago, said owner Terry Kasberg, and his business has taken a hit because of the competition.

"I'm literally going out of business because these places are doing something illegal," he said. "Either allow me to do it, or shut them the hell down."

Kasberg said he complained to the Sheriff's Office for nearly a year and kept receiving the same answer: "We're looking into it."

The games look like slot machines on a computer screen, and function nearly the same way.

Players buy game entries and use them to wager. Then they click a button that sets the slots into motion. Players win or lose points based on which icons the slots randomly land on.

The games become illegal when the points are redeemed for cash or other items of value.

Internet cafe owners call these games "sweepstakes." But Assistant State Attorney Mark Simpson said they're just slot machines.

A sweepstakes, Simpson said, requires participants to buy something else, and an entry into the sweepstakes comes with the purchase. An example, he said, is the Monopoly stickers that sometimes come with McDonald's food.

"It's done directly in the sale of consumer products," he said.

The product Internet cafes claim to sell, Simpson said, is Internet time, and then the slot entries come as the sweepstakes.

"Their product is just completely and totally bogus," Simpson said. He said customers don't go into those businesses to use the Internet; they do it to play the games.

"It's a facade," Simpson said. "It's a rouse."

On July 7, deputies shut down the two Spring Hill establishments, Safari Internet Cafe and the Cave, that were offering rewards, according to investigators. Deputies seized more than 60 computers from each location and arrested the owner of the two cafes, Genevieve Digiovanni, on charges of keeping a gambling house, playing games of chance and possession of slot machines.

Digiovanni, 77, of Spring Hill could face prison time, though Simpson said she is more likely to be placed on probation. Digiovanni could not be reached for comment.

Digiovanni's arrest report documented how an undercover deputy previously visited the Cave, provided an employee with money and played the slot-style games. Afterward, the report said, an employee told the deputy the money could be exchanged for currency.

When deputies shut down the Cave on July 7, an employee said the business had been allowing customers to redeem their game awards for cash for the past six weeks, according to the arrest report. Prior to that, the employee said, the business offered gift cards equivalent to the customers' rewards.

Even offering gift cards is illegal, Simpson said.

"Obviously a gift card has value, just like having cash," he said.

It was unclear if Kasberg's complaints led to the busts. The Hernando County Sheriff's Office declined to comment, citing the open cases. Since then, though, he has had more people through his doors, Kasberg said.

Simpson issued a warning to other businesses in the industry.

"If a place is open and it is conducting business like the Cave or Safari, then they have to understand they are operating at their peril," he said. "If there are other businesses out there, your turn's coming. We just haven't gotten to you."

Contact Josh Solomon at (813) 909-4613 or jsolomon@tampabay.com. Follow @josh_solomon15.

SPRING HILL — Senior citizens flock to Spinners Sweepstakes Cafe in a strip mall off U.S. 19.

Related News/Archive

  • Everybody's Business for Sept. 12: Mimi's Cafe closes

    More than a Year ago

  • Labor Day business and government closings in Hernando

    More than a Year ago

  • New privacy rules for Internet service would be illegal, providers say

    2 Months Ago

They drink coffee and eat Fig Newtons. Sometimes the only sound is the clicking of mouses as guests play the slot machine-style computer games.

They come even though it's fake money, and even though there's nothing to win.

"It's a place to gather in the afternoon for seniors," said Betty Burns, 86, of Spring Hill, mouse in hand. "It's social."

At least a half-dozen other Internet cafes in Hernando County offer computer slot games. But at least two of them have offered payouts to customers, according to the Hernando County Sheriff's Office, which closed them this month after conducting an undercover operation.

Spinners has not paid players since the practice was outlawed in Florida three years ago, said owner Terry Kasberg, and his business has taken a hit because of the competition.

"I'm literally going out of business because these places are doing something illegal," he said. "Either allow me to do it, or shut them the hell down."

Kasberg said he complained to the Sheriff's Office for nearly a year and kept receiving the same answer: "We're looking into it."

The games look like slot machines on a computer screen, and function nearly the same way.

Players buy game entries and use them to wager. Then they click a button that sets the slots into motion. Players win or lose points based on which icons the slots randomly land on.

The games become illegal when the points are redeemed for cash or other items of value.

Internet cafe owners call these games "sweepstakes." But Assistant State Attorney Mark Simpson said they're just slot machines.

A sweepstakes, Simpson said, requires participants to buy something else, and an entry into the sweepstakes comes with the purchase. An example, he said, is the Monopoly stickers that sometimes come with McDonald's food.

"It's done directly in the sale of consumer products," he said.

The product Internet cafes claim to sell, Simpson said, is Internet time, and then the slot entries come as the sweepstakes.

"Their product is just completely and totally bogus," Simpson said. He said customers don't go into those businesses to use the Internet; they do it to play the games.

"It's a facade," Simpson said. "It's a rouse."

On July 7, deputies shut down the two Spring Hill establishments, Safari Internet Cafe and the Cave, that were offering rewards, according to investigators. Deputies seized more than 60 computers from each location and arrested the owner of the two cafes, Genevieve Digiovanni, on charges of keeping a gambling house, playing games of chance and possession of slot machines.

Digiovanni, 77, of Spring Hill could face prison time, though Simpson said she is more likely to be placed on probation. Digiovanni could not be reached for comment.

Digiovanni's arrest report documented how an undercover deputy previously visited the Cave, provided an employee with money and played the slot-style games. Afterward, the report said, an employee told the deputy the money could be exchanged for currency.

When deputies shut down the Cave on July 7, an employee said the business had been allowing customers to redeem their game awards for cash for the past six weeks, according to the arrest report. Prior to that, the employee said, the business offered gift cards equivalent to the customers' rewards.

Even offering gift cards is illegal, Simpson said.

"Obviously a gift card has value, just like having cash," he said.

It was unclear if Kasberg's complaints led to the busts. The Hernando County Sheriff's Office declined to comment, citing the open cases. Since then, though, he has had more people through his doors, Kasberg said.

Simpson issued a warning to other businesses in the industry.

"If a place is open and it is conducting business like the Cave or Safari, then they have to understand they are operating at their peril," he said. "If there are other businesses out there, your turn's coming. We just haven't gotten to you."

Contact Josh Solomon at (813) 909-4613 or jsolomon@tampabay.com. Follow @josh_solomon15.

PUBLISHED: July 23, 2016 7:59 am LAST UPDATED: July 23, 2016 12:11 pm

A 39-year-old carpenter has denied murdering Horace Williams at a Smethwick internet cafe.

Police at the scene

Douane Brown from Bickington Road, Bartley Green is alleged to have stabbed the 36-year-old – who lived in West Bromwich and died from a single wound – on April 16.

The attack is said to have occurred at the Cape Hill Bureau de Change and internet cafe in Smethwick.

Brown pleaded not guilty when he appeared at Wolverhampton Crown Court yesterday.

He was remanded in custody to stand trial at Birmingham Crown Court in a hearing due to start on October 17. It is scheduled to last around five days

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SPRING HILL — Senior citizens flock to Spinners Sweepstakes Cafe in a strip mall off U.S. 19.

Related News/Archive

  • Everybody's Business for Sept. 12: Mimi's Cafe closes

    More than a Year ago

  • Labor Day business and government closings in Hernando

    More than a Year ago

  • New privacy rules for Internet service would be illegal, providers say

    2 Months Ago

They drink coffee and eat Fig Newtons. Sometimes the only sound is the clicking of mouses as guests play the slot machine-style computer games.

They come even though it's fake money, and even though there's nothing to win.

"It's a place to gather in the afternoon for seniors," said Betty Burns, 86, of Spring Hill, mouse in hand. "It's social."

At least a half-dozen other Internet cafes in Hernando County offer computer slot games. But at least two of them have offered payouts to customers, according to the Hernando County Sheriff's Office, which closed them this month after conducting an undercover operation.

Spinners has not paid players since the practice was outlawed in Florida three years ago, said owner Terry Kasberg, and his business has taken a hit because of the competition.

"I'm literally going out of business because these places are doing something illegal," he said. "Either allow me to do it, or shut them the hell down."

Kasberg said he complained to the Sheriff's Office for nearly a year and kept receiving the same answer: "We're looking into it."

The games look like slot machines on a computer screen, and function nearly the same way.

Players buy game entries and use them to wager. Then they click a button that sets the slots into motion. Players win or lose points based on which icons the slots randomly land on.

The games become illegal when the points are redeemed for cash or other items of value.

Internet cafe owners call these games "sweepstakes." But Assistant State Attorney Mark Simpson said they're just slot machines.

A sweepstakes, Simpson said, requires participants to buy something else, and an entry into the sweepstakes comes with the purchase. An example, he said, is the Monopoly stickers that sometimes come with McDonald's food.

"It's done directly in the sale of consumer products," he said.

The product Internet cafes claim to sell, Simpson said, is Internet time, and then the slot entries come as the sweepstakes.

"Their product is just completely and totally bogus," Simpson said. He said customers don't go into those businesses to use the Internet; they do it to play the games.

"It's a facade," Simpson said. "It's a rouse."

On July 7, deputies shut down the two Spring Hill establishments, Safari Internet Cafe and the Cave, that were offering rewards, according to investigators. Deputies seized more than 60 computers from each location and arrested the owner of the two cafes, Genevieve Digiovanni, on charges of keeping a gambling house, playing games of chance and possession of slot machines.

Digiovanni, 77, of Spring Hill could face prison time, though Simpson said she is more likely to be placed on probation. Digiovanni could not be reached for comment.

Digiovanni's arrest report documented how an undercover deputy previously visited the Cave, provided an employee with money and played the slot-style games. Afterward, the report said, an employee told the deputy the money could be exchanged for currency.

When deputies shut down the Cave on July 7, an employee said the business had been allowing customers to redeem their game awards for cash for the past six weeks, according to the arrest report. Prior to that, the employee said, the business offered gift cards equivalent to the customers' rewards.

Even offering gift cards is illegal, Simpson said.

"Obviously a gift card has value, just like having cash," he said.

It was unclear if Kasberg's complaints led to the busts. The Hernando County Sheriff's Office declined to comment, citing the open cases. Since then, though, he has had more people through his doors, Kasberg said.

Simpson issued a warning to other businesses in the industry.

"If a place is open and it is conducting business like the Cave or Safari, then they have to understand they are operating at their peril," he said. "If there are other businesses out there, your turn's coming. We just haven't gotten to you."

Contact Josh Solomon at (813) 909-4613 or jsolomon@tampabay.com. Follow @josh_solomon15.

The Palms II filed a civil suit in December to prevent law enforcement from stepping in. Judge says games do fit definition of slot machines.

Games at a local internet cafe violate state laws against slot machines, a judge ruled this week. Should The Palms II re-open on State Route 200, the judge’s findings pave the way for law enforcement to step in.

The case in front of Circuit Judge Edward Scott fell in civil court rather than criminal court. It dates back to December 2015, when the State Attorney’s Office warned Palms owners in a letter that their games violated state laws. The letter continued to warn that owners risked arrest and forfeiture of their machines should the cafe continue to operate.

Cafe owners took the case to court. Arguing that their games were based on skill rather than luck, and therefore should not be considered slot machines, they sought an injunction against State Attorney Brad King and then-Sheriff Chris Blair (later adjusted to current Sheriff Emery Gainey). The injunction would have prevented law enforcement from interfering in their operations. Cafe owners simultaneously sought a declaratory judgement action that would have validated their games as legal under state law.

In an order granting summary judgement, Scott this week instead ruled in favor of King and Gainey.

The Palms II has been closed since December, according to Justin Kaplan, a Miami-based attorney who represented plaintiffs in the case. He said his client is considering whether to appeal this week’s decision.

Playing a key role in court proceedings was the nature of the games at The Palms II.

Had Scott found them to be skill-based, as Kaplan argued he should, they would have fallen under the Family Amusement Games Act. This more recent legislation allows for some exceptions to the state’s wide-reaching prohibitions against gambling, which were broadened in 2013 to the point they threatened establishments like Chuck E. Cheese’s and Dave and Buster’s.

Scott instead found Palms machines to be games of chance, according to his order. That, under Florida law as interpreted by Scott, put them in violation of a another law regulating slot machines.

Court documents that describe how games at the cafe work suggest that games incorporate both skill and chance. Patrons would pay to use a machine, according to the court records. The first screen would show cascading tiles or a “loot wheel” that determined the amount of points they could potentially win. A second screen tasked them with “shooting” ducks, marked with percentage amounts, that moved across the screen. A patron who “shoots” a 25 percent duck would get 25 percent of the potential points indicated on the first screen.

The injunction petition likens the second screen to Nintendo’s “Duck Hunt” game from the late 1908s.

Patrons could redeem points on-site for low-cost merchandise, similar to an arcade, according to the injunction. A cash equivalent was not offered for points.

Noting in his order that facts of the case were not disputed, just how to interpret the laws surrounding them, Scott granted a motion for summary judgement. This meant that he, rather than a jury, ultimately decided on the case.

Kaplan, who noted competing evidence as to whether chance played a material role in the outcome of the game, said he feels the case should have gone to a jury.

The Palms II is not the first local internet cafe to come under the scrutiny of law enforcement. The Florida Department of Law Enforcement cracked down on cafes in 2014, closing at least two in Marion County. Authorities arrested another cafe manager last year.

Mark Simpson, an assistant state attorney who represented King in the case and who has prosecuted criminal cases against other internet cafes, said he is not aware of any internet cafes currently in operation in Marion County.

He said his office prosecutes internet cafes rigorously.

“If places open up,” he said, “we’ll find out about them.”

The Palms II closed after Gov. Rick Scott strengthened legislation on slot machines in 2013, according to Star-Banner reports, but re-opened quietly after a hiatus of several months. The Florida Division of Corporations indicates the establishment opened in 2011.

Contact Nicki Gorny at 352-867-4065, nicki.gorny@ocala.com or @Nicki_Gorny.

The Palms II filed a civil suit in December to prevent law enforcement from stepping in. Judge says games do fit definition of slot machines.

Games at a local internet cafe violate state laws against slot machines, a judge ruled this week. Should The Palms II re-open on State Route 200, the judge’s findings pave the way for law enforcement to step in.

The case in front of Circuit Judge Edward Scott fell in civil court rather than criminal court. It dates back to December 2015, when the State Attorney’s Office warned Palms owners in a letter that their games violated state laws. The letter continued to warn that owners risked arrest and forfeiture of their machines should the cafe continue to operate.

Cafe owners took the case to court. Arguing that their games were based on skill rather than luck, and therefore should not be considered slot machines, they sought an injunction against State Attorney Brad King and then-Sheriff Chris Blair (later adjusted to current Sheriff Emery Gainey). The injunction would have prevented law enforcement from interfering in their operations. Cafe owners simultaneously sought a declaratory judgement action that would have validated their games as legal under state law.

In an order granting summary judgement, Scott this week instead ruled in favor of King and Gainey.

The Palms II has been closed since December, according to Justin Kaplan, a Miami-based attorney who represented plaintiffs in the case. He said his client is considering whether to appeal this week’s decision.

Playing a key role in court proceedings was the nature of the games at The Palms II.

Had Scott found them to be skill-based, as Kaplan argued he should, they would have fallen under the Family Amusement Games Act. This more recent legislation allows for some exceptions to the state’s wide-reaching prohibitions against gambling, which were broadened in 2013 to the point they threatened establishments like Chuck E. Cheese’s and Dave and Buster’s.

Scott instead found Palms machines to be games of chance, according to his order. That, under Florida law as interpreted by Scott, put them in violation of a another law regulating slot machines.

Court documents that describe how games at the cafe work suggest that games incorporate both skill and chance. Patrons would pay to use a machine, according to the court records. The first screen would show cascading tiles or a “loot wheel” that determined the amount of points they could potentially win. A second screen tasked them with “shooting” ducks, marked with percentage amounts, that moved across the screen. A patron who “shoots” a 25 percent duck would get 25 percent of the potential points indicated on the first screen.

The injunction petition likens the second screen to Nintendo’s “Duck Hunt” game from the late 1908s.

Patrons could redeem points on-site for low-cost merchandise, similar to an arcade, according to the injunction. A cash equivalent was not offered for points.

Noting in his order that facts of the case were not disputed, just how to interpret the laws surrounding them, Scott granted a motion for summary judgement. This meant that he, rather than a jury, ultimately decided on the case.

Kaplan, who noted competing evidence as to whether chance played a material role in the outcome of the game, said he feels the case should have gone to a jury.

The Palms II is not the first local internet cafe to come under the scrutiny of law enforcement. The Florida Department of Law Enforcement cracked down on cafes in 2014, closing at least two in Marion County. Authorities arrested another cafe manager last year.

Mark Simpson, an assistant state attorney who represented King in the case and who has prosecuted criminal cases against other internet cafes, said he is not aware of any internet cafes currently in operation in Marion County.

He said his office prosecutes internet cafes rigorously.

“If places open up,” he said, “we’ll find out about them.”

The Palms II closed after Gov. Rick Scott strengthened legislation on slot machines in 2013, according to Star-Banner reports, but re-opened quietly after a hiatus of several months. The Florida Division of Corporations indicates the establishment opened in 2011.

Contact Nicki Gorny at 352-867-4065, nicki.gorny@ocala.com or @Nicki_Gorny.

LANdry is a way to get teens to do laundry by getting them to play internet games

Samsung came up with a creative way to market two very different products: the smartphone Galaxy S7 and a washing machine, the AddWash. The company decided to create an on-site entertainment laundromat that appeals to teens. Teens can visit this spot and while they do laundry, have fun with gameplay.

The Galaxy S7 and Addwash work together because the phone provides wireless control over the Addwash. Samsung wanted to see if technology could potentially make housework a more joyous experience for teens so they start helping out more at home.

The company is always playing with new, creative ideas and plans that utilize technology to the fullest extent. This may just be one way to reach the tech-obsessed youth generation of today.

Samsung

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Duluth, GA — A would-be robber and his victim, the owner of an internet cafe, shot and killed each other in a shootout late Monday night, police say.

It all began as Andrew Shin, 52, of Dunwoody, and his wife, Soyoun Ahn, were leaving their business, Time Internet Cafe at 3182 Steve Reynolds Blvd., shortly before midnight.

As they did, a man in a white mask and dark-colored hoodie approached them with a handgun, said Gwinnett County Police spokeswoman Cpl. Michele Pihera.

Police have identified the robber as Diante Doby, 22, of Snellville.

Doby "made some demands at the couple in an attempt to rob them," Pihera said.

Instead, Shin drew his own handgun and the two began shooting at each other. Ahn hid behind a nearby vehicle.

Shin was shot, falling near a white SUV along the sidewalk in front of the business. Doby, who was also shot, crawled into a dark colored passenger car driven by another woman, Kendra Yvonne Gates, 22, of Stone Mountain, police said.

She drove to the McDonald's at 1963 Pleasant Hill Rd., pulled into the parking lot and called 911, telling the dispatcher her boyfriend had been shot.

Officers were dispatched to both locations and soon realized the shootings were connected.

Both men died from their injuries — Shin in front of his business and Doby at the McDonald's, Pihera said.

Gates was taken to Gwinnett County Police headquarters for an interview. She was charged with armed robbery.

The initial call to the internet cafe was at 11:56 p.m. and the call to McDonald's was at 12:03 a.m.

(Photos courtesy Gwinnett County Police Department)


Duluth, GA — A would-be robber and his victim, the owner of an internet cafe, shot and killed each other in a shootout late Monday night, police say.

It all began as Andrew Shin, 52, of Dunwoody, and his wife, Soyoun Ahn, were leaving their business, Time Internet Cafe at 3182 Steve Reynolds Blvd., shortly before midnight.

As they did, a man in a white mask and dark-colored hoodie approached them with a handgun, said Gwinnett County Police spokeswoman Cpl. Michele Pihera.

Police have identified the robber as Diante Doby, 22, of Snellville.

Doby "made some demands at the couple in an attempt to rob them," Pihera said.

Instead, Shin drew his own handgun and the two began shooting at each other. Ahn hid behind a nearby vehicle.

Shin was shot, falling near a white SUV along the sidewalk in front of the business. Doby, who was also shot, crawled into a dark colored passenger car driven by another woman, Kendra Yvonne Gates, 22, of Stone Mountain, police said.

She drove to the McDonald's at 1963 Pleasant Hill Rd., pulled into the parking lot and called 911, telling the dispatcher her boyfriend had been shot.

Officers were dispatched to both locations and soon realized the shootings were connected.

Both men died from their injuries — Shin in front of his business and Doby at the McDonald's, Pihera said.

Gates was taken to Gwinnett County Police headquarters for an interview. She was charged with armed robbery.

The initial call to the internet cafe was at 11:56 p.m. and the call to McDonald's was at 12:03 a.m.

(Photos courtesy Gwinnett County Police Department)